March 26, 2017

Resolving to Lose Weight: Gain Healthy Habits Instead

Losing weight is the number one New Year’s resolution, according to the Statistic Brain Research Institute. But it’s estimated only eight percent of those who make resolutions this time of year will succeed in achieving their goals.

Katherine Brown, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association, says it’s important to take small, achievable steps to get healthy, instead of embarking on a big diet and facing the inevitable yo-yo effects of losing and regaining that weight.

“One of the number one things relative to getting healthy in the New Year, is just remembering that consistency is the key,” says Brown. “And to develop an accountability partner, someone that you can check in with.”

While weight loss is often the goal, Brown says getting heart-healthy should be the motivation. The American Heart Association says heart disease is the number two killer in North Carolina, and the state ranks 20th in the country for a high rate of cardiovascular disease.

Brown says it’s important to establish healthy eating habits you can live with, and increase your amount of physical activity, all with the long-term in mind.

“If you just say ‘weight loss,’ it means it’s lost and it can be found again,” says Brown. “Versus looking at making an absolute lifestyle change.”

Brown adds that 68 percent of North Carolinians are obese, slightly higher than the national average. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends getting at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week.

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