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39th Annual Pow Wow on Qualla Boundary

powwow1For almost four decades, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has hosted its annual Pow Wow on the Qualla Boundary and this year’s promises to be the best ever.

This year’s event, July 4-6, features world-champion dancers and drums competing for prizes. Vendors from across the country will offer food and arts and crafts items. The Pow Wow attracts thousands of visitors each year from all over the world.

Dance competitions are open to participants in five groups and several categories including Traditional, Grass, Fancy, Straight, Jingle and Buckskin. There will also be Northern and Southern Singing prizes and a Hand Drum special. Age groups include “Golden Age” contestants (age 50+), men and women (age 18-49), teens (13-17), Junior (6-12), and tiny tots (under age 5). Specials include Men’s Fancy and Straight, Women’s Jingle, Old Style Fancy Shawl, Cowboy/girl and two Junior specials.

The Pow Wow opens at the Acquoni Expo Center (formerly Cherokee High School) Friday, July 4, at 5 p.m. with a grand entry at 7 p.m. and a fireworks show at 10:00 p.m. The event begins Saturday, July 5 at 10 a.m. and grand entry at 1 p.m. and 7 a.m., and Sunday, July 6, at  gates open at noon with grand entry at 1 p.m. Admission is $10 per day with a weekend pass for $25.

Higher Gas Prices, Heavy Traffic This Holiday

North Carolina highways are expected to be unusually busy over the Independence Day holiday despite relatively high gas prices.

More than a million North Carolinians are expected to hit the road for the holiday, the highest number in more than a decade, according to AAA Carolinas.

North Carolina gas prices, averaging $3.56 a gallon, are 16 cents higher than over the July 4th holiday last year, with prices this year the highest since 2008. Asheville’s average price is $3.64, tied with Durham for the highest in the state.

The Fourth of July holiday typically is dangerous on the roads. Traffic deaths soared last year over the holiday weekend, with 18 deaths, the highest in eight years in North Carolina. In seven of those deaths, alcohol was involved.

The N.C. Highway Patrol began its “Booze It & Lose It: Operation Firecracker” campaign targeting drunken drivers June 27 and will continue it through Sunday.

According to AAA, the number of North Carolinians traveling more than 50 miles from home is expected to be 1,175,000, with 1,015,000 choosing to drive — up from 988,000 last year.

Airplane trips are estimated at 90,400. Other types of travel — bus, rail, watercraft — are estimated at 70,000.

North Carolina will suspend most construction projects along interstates, secondary and primary routes from 4 p.m. Thursday to 9 a.m. Monday.

Celebrate the 4th of July in Our Region!

Bryson City

• Freedom Fest begins at 8 a.m. in downtown with the Rotary International Firecracker 5K. Riverfront Park will hold the Strut Your Mutt pet show and the Explore Kids’ Street children activities will run from 6 to 9 p.m. Also at the park will be the Smoky Mountain Rollergirls dunking booth from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Bridge Stage on Everett Street will have live music throughout the day, with the fireworks show beginning at 10 p.m. Free. www.greatsmokies.com/freedomfest.

• NOC’s Sizzlin’ 4th of July will run July 4-6 and the NRC Family Whitewater Weekend will run July 5-6 at the Nantahala Outdoor Center in the Nantahala Gorge. Nantahala Racing Club’s adventure race will be at 4 p.m. July 5, with live music at 7 p.m. at Big Wesser BBQ. Slalom races will be at noon July 6. Free. 828.232.7238 or www.noc.com.

• Singing In The Smokies Independence Weekend Festival will run July 3-5 at Inspiration Park. Hosted by Appalachian/gospel group The Inspirations, the event features live music from The Kingsmen, Troy Burns Family, Dixie Echoes, Chris Smith, Daron Osbourne, Evidence of Grace, and many more. $20 per day, per adult. Children ages 12 and under free. www.theinspirations.com.

• Freedom Train at the Great Smoky Mountains Railroad will depart at 7:30 p.m. July 4 at the Bryson City Depot. The trek will head to the Fontana Trestle and return just in time for the fireworks in downtown Bryson City. First Class, Crown Class and Coach Class seating available. All ticket purchases of any class include a meal. 800.872.4681 or www.gsmr.com.

Canton

• The town’s 4th of July Celebration begins at 6 p.m. July 5 at Sorrells Street Park. Live music, dancing, food and craft vendors. Watermelons will be provided for free, with children’s watermelon rolls and seed spitting contests to commence. Fireworks at dusk. Free. www.cantonnc.com.

Cashiers

• Fireworks Extravaganza on the Green begins at 6:30 p.m. July 4 at the Village Green Commons. Live music will be provided by rhythm and blues band The Extraordinaires. The Cashiers Farmers’ Market and numerous food vendors will be onsite. There will also be moonshine margaritas, beer and wine available. Fireworks begin at dusk. Free, with VIP packages available. www.villagegreencashiersnc.com or 828.743.3434.

Cherokee

• 4th of July Fireworks will be held at dusk on July 4 at the Acquoni Expo Center. The Sunset 5K Run will also be held at 5 p.m. The Cherokee bonfire will be at 7:30 p.m. at the Oconaluftee Islands Park Bonfire Pit. www.cherokeesmokies.com.

• The 39th annual Eastern Band of Cherokee Pow Wow begins at 5 p.m. July 4, 10 a.m. July 5 and 7 a.m. July 6 at the Acquoni Expo Center (formerly Cherokee High School). The event features world-champion dancers and drummers competing for prizes. Vendors from across the country will offer food and arts and crafts items. $10 per day with a weekend pass for $25. www.visitcherokeenc.com.

Fontana Village Resort

• 4th of July at Fontana Village Resort will be July 2-5. The event features cornhole and Pac Man tournaments,  a sunset cruise, documentaries, games and children’s activities. Performances will include the Larry Barnett Duo at 7 p.m. July 2, Unit 50 at 7 p.m. July 3, Fast Gear at 6 p.m. and The Chillbillies at 9 p.m. July 4, and Old Red Schoolhouse at 7 p.m. July 5. Fireworks will be at 10 p.m. July 4. www.fontanavillage.com.

Franklin

• 4th of July Parade and Celebration, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 4, in downtown. Parade starts at 10 a.m. The Fireworks in the Park will be held at 3 p.m. until dark at the Macon County Veterans Memorial Recreation Park. The park features a cornhole tournament at 3 p.m. (registration begins at 1:30 p.m.), famous plunger toss at 7 p.m. and bull’s eye ball drop at 9:15 p.m., with fireworks at dusk. Live music will be provided by Miss Kitty & The Big City Band at 7 p.m., with the Presentation of the Colors at 9:15 p.m. and the singing of the national anthem at 9:30 p.m. Food vendors will also be onsite. www.franklin-chamber.com.

Highlands

• July 4th Fireworks, 11 a.m. until dusk July 4, in downtown. Cookout begins at 11 a.m. at the baseball field, with the 3rd annual Rotary Rubber Ducky Derby at 3 p.m. at Mill Creek, live music at 6 p.m. at Town Square and Pine Street Park, and patriotic sing-along at 8 p.m. at the Presbyterian Church. Fireworks at 9 p.m.  Free. 828.526.2112 or www.highlandschamber.org.

Lake Glenville

• Lake Glenville Fireworks, 8:30 p.m. July 5 over the lake. www.cashiersareachamber.com.

Lake Junaluska

• The 4th of July Celebration will be July 3-6 at the Lake Junaluska Conference and Retreat Center. A fish fry will be at 5:30 p.m. July 3 next to Stuart Auditorium. The Star Spangled Salute kicks off with a parade at 11 a.m. July 4, with a barbecue at noon and fireworks at 9:30 p.m. There will also be an array of children’s activities from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 5 at the pool, with a performance by the Carolina Water Ski Show at 1 p.m. on the lake. Live music will be performed by the Lake Junaluska Singers at 7:30 p.m. July 3-4 and by Balsam Range at 7:30 p.m. July 5. Tickets for each show are $17.50 general admission and $20 for reserved seating. www.lakejunaluska.com/july4th or 800.222.4930.

• Doug Stanford Memorial Rodeo, Ram Rodeo Series will be 8 p.m. July 4-5 at the Haywood County Fairgrounds in Lake Junaluska.

Maggie Valley

• Backyard 4th Celebration will be from 6 to 11 p.m. July 4 at the Maggie Valley Festival Grounds. Fireworks at dusk. Free. 828.926.0866 or www.townofmaggievalley.com.

• Wheels Through Time Museum’s 12th anniversary in Maggie Valley Fourth of July celebration will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Rare and unique machines spanning more than 110 years of transportation history, dating back to the very roots of motorized travel. www.wheelsthroughtime.com or 828.926.6266.

Sapphire Valley

• 9th annual Yankee Doodle Dandy Day, will be held 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 4 at the Sapphire Valley track and recreation center areas. Swimming, outdoor games and contests, inflated bouncy toys, live music, sports contests, food, pony rides and the Horsepasture River Ducky Derby.

Sylva

• 4th of July Concerts on the Creek with Dashboard Blues will be at 7:30 p.m. July 4 at Bridge Park. Free. www.mountainlovers.com.

Waynesville

• Stars and Stripes Celebration, will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 4 in downtown. Shops, galleries and restaurants open, with live music and entertainment. Kids on Main Patriotic Parade will be at 11 a.m. The Main Street Cookout, featuring local craft beer, barbecue, burgers and hot dogs will be from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at United Community Bank. The Haywood Community Band performs at 2 p.m. on the courthouse lawn. Free. www.downtownwaynesville.com.

Cherokee County Man Charged with Murder

A Cherokee County man is behind bars on a murder charge in the death of another man.

John Anthony Hill, 43, was charged in the Sunday slaying of Paul George Pfleiderer

Deputies went to Hill’s home in the Peachtree community off N.C. 141 shortly after 7 p.m. Sunday in response to a 911 call reporting a home invasion in progress at the residence.

Hill met officers as they arrived, and officers found Pfleiderer, also of Peachtree, dead inside Hill’s home.

After processing the scene with assistance from the SBI, investigators determined the death was “consistent with homicide,”

Hill is being held at the Cherokee County Detention Center under a $500,000 secured bond. His first court appearance in Cherokee County District Court is scheduled for July 8.

4th of July Beach Plans? Think Again.

A hurricane watch has been issued for part of North Carolina’s coast as Tropical Storm Arthur moves northward, threatening Fourth of July plans along the East Coast. The hurricane watch in North Carolina covers an area from Bogue Inlet to Oregon Inlet, including Pamlico Sound. A tropical storm watch is in effect for parts of Florida and South Carolina. The storm’s maximum sustained winds early Wednesday are near 60 mph (95 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Arthur is expected to strengthen and become a hurricane by Thursday. Arthur is centered about 90 miles (145 kilometers) east of Cape Canaveral, Florida, and is moving north near 6 mph (9 kph). The Hurricane Center urged those as far north as parts of Virginia to monitor Tropical Storm Arthur’s path. 

Got To Be NC Agriculture Month

Farmers across North Carolina are in full swing, bringing their fresh fruits and vegetables to market. Those farmers are part of the state’s $78-billion agriculture industry. In recognition of agriculture’s importance as the state’s top industry, Gov. Pat McCrory has proclaimed July 2014 as Got to Be NC Agriculture Month.

Got to Be NC, the official state identity program for North Carolina agricultural products, is managed by the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The agency works with farmers, agribusinesses, retail partners and foodservice providers to promote North Carolina agricultural products and find new markets to help local farmers.

Several special events are planned during July to celebrate Got to Be NC Agriculture Month, including:

Peach Days at the state-operated farmers markets in Raleigh (July 10) and Colfax (July 18);

Dig into Local Restaurant Week, July 14-23, with participation from restaurants in eight Piedmont counties;

Watermelon Days at the state-operated farmers markets in Charlotte (July 11), Asheville (July 18), Colfax (July 25) and Raleigh (July 31).

The department offers a variety of free, online directories to help consumers find local food near them. Go to www.gottobenc.com to learn more about the products grown, raised, caught or made in North Carolina.

Emergency Department ReOpens at MedWest Haywood

The Emergency Department at MedWest Haywood reopened for patient care today, less than two weeks after an electrical fire resulted in relocation of all patients in the main hospital. The reopening is  slightly ahead of a projected early July date, and comes after successfully completing review and approval by technical and governmental agencies, including the North Carolina Department of Health Service Regulation.

 

Carolinas MED-1 will remain onsite in a supporting role for a short period of time while the Emergency Department transition is completed.

 

MedWest Haywood nears completion of the short-term recovery phase, which also includes opening other departments such as the business offices. It is expected that all inpatient services will be reopened by mid- late July.

 

The MedWest Haywood team is working with an electrical engineering firm who is leading the charge and is supported by several local firms, Carolinas HealthCare System and other partners on a very methodical process to get MedWest Haywood up and running as quickly as possible.

 

Working with its insurance carrier MedWest Haywood has been able to ensure all employees a continuation of benefits and payroll during this recovery time.

 

All other MedWest Haywood facilities including The Outpatient Care Center, The Health & Fitness Center, all related physician practices, the Home Health and Hospice and Urgent Care Centers, have remained fully operational throughout this incident.

Coal Ash Bill Leaves Questions

A bill (SB-729) that would close all coal-ash ponds in the state by 2029 is now in the hands of the North Carolina House. Among the provisions, it requires Duke Energy to remove the ash from four of its plants and place it into lined landfills.

While it sounds like the solution citizens and environmental groups have been asking for, the Cape Fear Riverkeeper – Kemp Burdette – says he’s concerned that the coal-ash ponds near him and others are left off the list. “There’s no real detail about what cleanup means for these other 10 sites. These ponds are frequently built on top of existing streams, frequently built on wetland areas.”

The Duke plant on the Cape Fear River is not among the four scheduled for immediate cleanup in the bill, but in recent years there’s been evidence of toxic coal ash leaking into the ground water supply of area residents. Duke recently partnered with the local water department to create a new water source for the families effected. On the list to be immediately cleaned up are the Asheville, Sutton, Dan River and Riverbend sites. Duke says it continues to cooperate with the state.

Supporters say the Senate bill expands on the proposal to clean up the coal ash by Governor Pat McCrory – who retired from Duke Energy.

However, Burdette and others are concerned that it will allow Duke to reclassify illegal discharges of coal ash under permits already approved by the state. “What this bill does is basically say that, with the stroke of a pen, we’re going to take what has been illegal discharges, un-permitted discharges, and we’re just going to kind of wrap them under existing permits.”

The legislation also does not require Duke or other companies to use liner systems in any new storage of toxic coal ash, but it does require the company to monitor groundwater for the next 30 years.

Sylva Welcomes ECU Dental Clinic at Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

photo (15)With the opening of each dental community service learning center, East Carolina University is “changing the trajectory of oral health care in North Carolina.”

 

That was the message delivered by School of Dental Medicine Dean Dr. Greg Chadwick as ECU administrators and Jackson County officials celebrated the opening of the university’s newest center, located 50 miles west of Asheville in Sylva.

 

“This dream is important, I think, for everyone in this region,” ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard told attendees at the ribbon cutting. “You really made it possible to get this beautiful site. Thanks for being a part of a mission we take very seriously.”

 

Eight to 10 centers are planned for underserved areas of North Carolina. Four centers are now in operation and “all are becoming very busy places,” Chadwick reported.

 

The facilities combine clinical education and patient care. Led by ECU dental faculty members, fourth-year students are receiving clinical training at the centers while general dentistry residents also hone their skills at the facilities. The fully functional general dentistry centers feature treatment rooms, X-ray equipment, educational space and more.

 

“Our school is a statewide resource with a statewide footprint,” Chadwick said. “These centers are an integral part of our dental school.”

 

Local officials said there is a great need for dental care in Jackson County.

 

“Oral health is very important and for many folks it goes unmet, undone,” said Paula Carden, director of the Jackson County Health Department. “This great facility is going to lower the burden on our emergency rooms.”

 

Carden said Jackson County has one dentist for every 2,748 people, while the national average is one dentist per 1,493 people. And some of the dentists practicing in the area are getting “long in the tooth,” she quipped.

 

“The School of Dentistry, from East Carolina, is going to give western North Carolina its smile back,” Carden said.

 

Jackson County Commissioner Charles Elders welcomed the first four students on rotation in the Sylva center and said he hopes the experience will yield more dentists for underserved areas.

 

“Our hope is that when you graduate…you will choose a rural community, just like you’re in today,” he said. “You will find our citizens to be courteous, welcoming, supportive, and just good neighbors.”

 

“Jackson County has a great relationship with Chancellor David Belcher and Western Carolina,” Elders added. “We’re pleased to welcome another purple and gold institution.”

 

ECU dental community service learning centers are already serving patients in Ahoskie, Elizabeth City, Lillington and Sylva. Other centers are under construction in Spruce Pine, Davidson County and Robeson County, and an eighth center will be located in Brunswick County.

 

The Sylva center is located at 316 County Services Park. Appointments can be scheduled by calling 828-586-1200. Any member of the community – including Medicaid patients – can receive dental care at the centers.

 

Fire Repairs at Med West Haywood

After small electrical fire at Med West Haywood last Thursday evening, there has been a great deal of work going on behind the scenes to not only determine the cause of the electrical failure but also determine what steps will be needed to reopen the hospital to patient care. The question on everyone’s mind is when Med West Haywood will re-open.

The timeline to reopen is still tentative, but Med West is hoping to reopen the hospital to patient care in a matter of weeks. Some rumors circulating have projected it could be months.

The hospital is taking a number of important steps before they can re-open, including verifying the safety and dependability of power systems, assessing the medical equipment and devices, and the inspection of the hospital and systems by the Department of Healthcare Services Review and other agencies.. Based on current information MedWest Haywood believes they may  be able to re-open services located in the main hospital such as the Emergency Department, and administration offices in early July.  Other sections of the hospital including inpatient services could be active at the end of July. It is possible that technical and governmental approvals may cause this timeline to shift so for now it is a waiting game for Med West Haywood. Med West has said the fire will not affect the hospital’s sale to Duke Life Point which is expected to close by the end of July.

 

Webster Man Charged in Domestic Incident

53ac376c094c4.preview-300A Webster man has been charged with multiple felonies after a domestic situation on Wednesday. Jackson County Authorities were called to home in the Webster community after a woman called saying her estranged husband had entered her residence and pointed a handgun at the parties inside. During the domestic altercation, the female victim and other parties had a physical confrontation with the suspect, David Lee Hinnant, 30. Hinnnt fled the scene before law enforcement arrived but an accurate vehicle description was obtained by 911 dispatchers. A short time after, the suspect was apprehended without incident.

Hinnant is charged with 5 counts of assault by pointing a gun, 5 counts of assault with a deadly weapon, 7 counts of assault with deadly weapon with intent to kill, 2 counts of breaking and/or entering, 7 counts of first degree kidnapping, and 1 county of carrying a concealed weapon.

Waterfall Safety in Jackson County

With temperatures rising and visitors flocking to the mountains, many will venture out to local waterfalls to beat the heat. It’s tempting to cool off near a waterfall. However, waterfalls can be extremely dangerous.

Just this past weekend on Saturday, a 20 year old WCU student suffered minor injuries after a tumble from Paradise Falls located below Wolf Creek Dam in Canada community. Jackson County has seen it’s share of fatalities as a result of slips around waterfalls.

The US Forest Service urges visitors to practice waterfall safety and remember the best way to enjoy a waterfall is from a safe distance. Never climb on waterfalls. Don’t jump off waterfalls and don’t swim in pools or wade in streams above waterfalls.

 

Avoiding Snake Bites in NC

Folks living in North Carolina have a better chance of getting bitten by a snake than people living anywhere else, according to new research. North Carolina’s estimated rate of snake bites is nearly five times the national average.

Of the 37 species of snakes throughout North Carolina, only six are venomous, 3 of which are found in the Western counties: Copperhead (found throughout NC), Canebrake Rattlesnake (found throughout NC), Cottonmouth or Water Moccasin.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, about 8,000 people a year receive venomous snake bites in the United States, and only 9 to 15 victims (.2%) die. In fact more people die from wasp and bee stings than from snake bites. Most of the fatalities received no medical treatment or first aid. The same simple care one takes around wasp nests and busy roads also suffices to keep the risk of snake bite to acceptable levels. Nonetheless, venomous snakes must be considered dangerous and even non-fatal bites can cause severe pain and long-lasting tissue damage.

Some bites, such as those inflicted when snakes are accidentally stepped on or encountered in wilderness settings, are nearly impossible to prevent. But experts say a few precautions can lower the risk of being bitten:

  • Leave snakes alone. Many people are bitten when they try to kill a snake or get a closer look at it.
  • Stay out of tall grass and remain on hiking paths as much as possible.
  • Keep hands and feet out of areas you can’t see. Don’t pick up rocks or firewood unless you are out of a snake’s striking distance. (A snake can strike half its length.)
  • Be cautious and alert when climbing rocks.

What do you do if you suddenly encounter a snake? If you must walk around the snake, give it some room–at least six feet. Otherwise, walk away. Leave it alone and don’t try to catch it.

Though venomous snakes can be dangerous, snake venom may have a positive side. Clinical trials are presently under way to test the therapeutic value of a venom-derived product called ancrod in treating stroke. Earlier proposals, using snake venom to treat neuromuscular disorders such as multiple sclerosis, never reached the clinical trial stage.

Living with venomous snakes is really no different than living with hornets, or other minor risks of daily life. If one finds a hornet nest, one does not disturb it. The same caution should be applied if one sees a snake. Injury may result if hornets or snakes are disturbed or harassed. However, in North America human injuries from playing sports or slipping in the bathtub are far more common than are injuries from snakes. Venomous snakes are simply not a significant human health issue in North America. The appropriate response to encountering a snake is to simply walk away. Do not attempt to capture or kill it, as 70-80% of bites occur in this manner.

Stanley Furniture to Close

Stanley Furniture in Graham County will close doors at the end of this month. Stanley Furniture is the largest employer in Graham County and will be laying off 400 workers. In a town with a population of 8600, that’s a large chunk of the work force. The county currently has 513 unemployed. Only 3,569 residents are currently counted as holding jobs.

Joblessness in the county is expected to double. Graham County already has one of the highest numbers of unemployment in the state but it is expected to jump from 10.6% to 22.1% after the lay offs.

Smokies Deputy Superintendent Mourned

Great Smoky Mountains National Park staff are mourning the loss of Deputy Superintendent Patty Wissinger, age 55, who passed away Friday night of cancer. Wissinger was recently selected as the Smokies Deputy Superintendent last August.

Wissinger began her National Park Service career in 1980 as a seasonal campground ranger on the Blue Ridge Parkway and moved up through the Park Service ranks. Before coming to the Smokies, she was the Superintendent of Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area. She also served at the Blue Ridge Parkway, Shenandoah National Park, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Wright Brothers National Memorial, Vicksburg National Military Park, and Fort Raleigh National Historic Site.

She is survived by her husband, Gordon Wissinger, three daughters, three grandchildren, and five siblings. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 at Central United Methodist Church in Asheville, NC

NC Sluggish Economy And Low Wage Jobs

North Carolina’s economic recovery is marked by slow job growth and challenges for working families to make ends meet as costs rise. Job growth has concentrated in low wage industries.

According to the Living Income Standard released by the Tax and Budget Center, North Carolina needs to create about 482,000 jobs to replace the ones lost during the recession and to keep up with population growth.  Living Income Standard for one adult with one child is approximately $16.21 an hour to meet basic needs which equals $33,709.00 a year in pay. 80% of the jobs created in NC between 2009 and 2013 are in industries paying far below the $33,709 target.

On average in North Carolina, male workers can expect to make $16.93 an hour while females earn an average of $14.03 an hour. Workers in NC have actually seen their wages fall according to the Tax and Budget Center. There is a  3.3% increase in the output of worker with a decrease of 5.5% in wages which means workers are not being compensated for their increased productivity and efficiency.

WCU Listed as Top Performing Arts Center

The John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center at Western Carolina University was recently included on a list of “The 25 Most Amazing University Performing Arts Centers” by the website BestValueSchools.com.

The website authors listed the Bardo Arts Center at No. 19 and said the facility “combines a state-of-the-art space with a naturally beautiful setting to promote the arts and arts education throughout the region.”

The Bardo Arts Center, which houses WCU’s School of Art and Design, opened in 2005 with a performance by Jay Leno of NBC’s “Tonight Show.” The facility includes a 1,000-seat performance hall that provides a venue for visiting performers and entertainers, and it also houses WCU’s Fine Art Museum, widely considered to be the premiere showcase for contemporary art in Western North Carolina.

Beat the Heat as Temperatures Rise In Area

New York Hit With Earlier Summer Heat WaveThe North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and other health officials are urging everyone to take caution as extreme temperatures arrive in North Carolina. Older North Carolinians are very susceptible to complications from extreme heat. The North Carolina Division of Aging and Adult Services is encouraging frequent checks on older family members and neighbors to be sure they are protected from the heat but of course encourage safetey measures for people of all ages.

The Center for Disease Control estimate about 650 deaths occur each year as a result of extreme heat. In 2012, one large scale heat event claimed 32 lives in a two week period as temperatures in the mid-atlantic states rose above 100 degrees.

Steps such as drinking plenty of water and juice to stay hydrated are vital. Limiting time outdoors especially in the afternoon when the sun and temperatures are at their peak. Children should be monitored for symptoms such as muscle cramps, fatigue, dizziness, headache and nausea. If you live in a home without air conditioning and fans, opening windows for air flow and closing blinds, shades and curtains during the hottest part of the day or when windows are in direct sunlight help, cool showers can help and do not use a fan if the temperature is above 95 degrees, the hot air can add to heat stress. Never leave children, disabled or older persons, or a pet in unattended cars. Ask your doctor if medications you may be taking can impede heat loss which can include kidney, diabetes and some mental health medications.

Last week across the state, 95 heat related illnesses were reported in emergency rooms across the state. The National weather services is forecasting heat up to 103 and 105 degrees in some parts of the state. People who are exercising, doing yard work or recreational activities, and those who have outdoor jobs should take proper precautions to avoid illnesses when temperatures are high.

 

Debit Card Scams

With many banks offering fraud alerts for credit and debit cards, It can be easy to fall for fake versions. The Better Business Bureau of Asheville and Western North Carolina warns to watch out for automated phone calls or text messages that claim your cards has been deactivated. It’s really an attempt to get you to share your banking and personal information.

The scam works by getting a call or text alerting you that your credit or debit card has been deactivated. Reactivating your card is easy you just need to call customer service number and confirm some information. When you dial the number it instructs you to enter your 16 digit credit card number. Better Business Bureau warns not to do it because it’s a scam.  Some ways to spot this scam are to call your bank and check their website. Find the phone number from your bank’s website, never use the number that has been text to you. Ignore instructions that tell you to reply STOP or NO to unsubscribe from future texts. This is often a ploy for scammers to confirm they have a real working number. Forward texts to 7726. This service alerts your cell phone provider to block future texts from this number. Be familiar with your banks communications methods. Did you sign up for text messaging alerts? Be aware of how your bank communicates with you because anything out of the ordinary could be a scam

Jackson County Transit Receives Grant

Jackson County Transit received grant funding which will enable transportation services to be provided at a reduced rate for residents who are disabled or who are 60 years of age or above for Door to Door Services beginning July 1, 2014.

As long as funding is available for qualifying individuals, fares will only be $1 each way for scheduled trips within the county and $1 added for each additional stop. The reduced fare can add up to big savings for many elderly and disabled residents in Jackson County. For example, Kim Shuler, Mobile Coordinator for Jackson County Transit, explained a ride from Cullowhee to Sylva usually costs around $3 one way. Riders from Little Canada could pay $4 for one way rides into Sylva. The grant which is offered annually will pass along savings to residents. Shuler told WRGC, the Jackson County Transit will certainly reapply for the federal grant again in 2015.

Medical trips to Swain, Haywood, and Macon will be only $5 round trip, and $10 round trip to Asheville.  Trips to destinations outside of Jackson County must be scheduled five days in advance. Rides within Jackson County and extra stops must be scheduled at least 24 hours in advance.  It will not be possible to make stops that have not been scheduled.

For more information or to register for this program come by the office at 1148 Haywood Road in Sylva (past the Dillsboro Huddle House) or call the Jackson County Transit office at 828-586-0233.