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Storm Tears Through Cullowhee; Damages Hunter Library

Attachment-1A storm hit campus at 7:20 Wednesday evening. High winds, heavy rain, reports of trees down and power lines down all over Jackson County.
Hardest hit area of campus was Hunter Library.

Nine trees fell onto the roof of the library, and another 10 trees down that blocked the road. Those trees are probably 50 years old or older.
Also some trees down in other areas of campus, but not nearly to the same extent as at the library.

Two trees down near Scott residence hall, and a tree on the upper campus that apparently was struck by lighting and split in two.

Library sustained damage to the roof. Our crews estimated 50 to 60 puncture holes in the roof.

Work crews have already patched those holes, and were done doing so by about 4:30 this morning.

In addition, there is some water damage to the interior of the library. Debris from the trees, pine needles, leaves and other debris clogged up the drainage system, and also water came through the holes in the roof…probably hundreds and hundreds of gallons of water.

But the library has a plan to handle situations like this, and the library staff went into high gear to implement the plan, moved books and maps, and used plastic to cover items in the library to protect them from further damage.

The area of the library affected the most was the map collections area, which experienced some flooding and water damage. It appears that the damage is minimal.

We do not yet have an estimate of cost of damages to the campus from the storm.

Wells Fargo Diversity and Leadership Scholars Program

Western Carolina University is creating a new endowed scholarship initiative designed to provide financial support to underserved students who exhibit leadership qualities and who come from diverse populations, thanks to a gift of $150,000 from Wells Fargo.
Announcement of the Wells Fargo Diversity and Leadership Scholars Program came Friday, June 5, at the Wells Fargo Business Center in WCU’s College of Business.
Proceeds from the endowment will be used to provide annual assistance to a minimum of three students at Western Carolina. Preference will be given to low-income students from diverse backgrounds who are the first generation in their families to attend college.
“This new scholarship program will help underserved and underrepresented students to complete their studies at Western Carolina University and move into leadership positions, to lead productive lives and to leave a positive impact on the communities in which they live,” WCU Chancellor David O. Belcher said.
“The creation of additional endowed scholarship funds to provide financial support to deserving students is our university’s top philanthropic priority,” Belcher said. “We are pleased that Wells Fargo once again is demonstrating its commitment to being a key partner in the education and development of WCU students who will graduate with the skills and competencies necessary to make a significant and immediate contribution to our regional and state economy.”
Recipients of Wells Fargo Diversity and Leadership Scholarships must have completed freshman year requirements with no sanctions in place and must demonstrate characteristics of outstanding leadership.
The scholarship will be aimed at students residing in one of the 48 counties comprising the Western North Carolina, Greater Charlotte and Triad regions of North Carolina, and at those majoring in programs in WCU’s College of Education and Allied Professions, College of Business or College of Health and Human Sciences.
“The success of students is a critical element in keeping our communities strong and prosperous, and Wells Fargo is committed to providing them with every possible resource to achieve long-term success,” said Jim Wood, Wells Fargo’s WNC business banking manager. “Today’s young people are tomorrow’s business owners, leaders and teachers, and we are proud to support our partners at WCU in their efforts to provide scholarships to underserved students.”
The gift for the new scholarship program represents the latest example of a long-standing partnership between Western Carolina and Wells Fargo.
In 2011, WCU named the newly refurbished auditorium in the Forsyth Building, home to the College of Business, as the Wells Fargo Business Center in recognition of contributions totaling $150,000. The funds helped equip and furnish the renovated center, and provide scholarship assistance to students in the College of Business and financial support for faculty development efforts within the college.
In previous years, Wells Fargo provided support for the Professional Sales Center in the College of Business, graduate research activities, programming in the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center, and celebration of the College of Education and Allied Professions’ receipt of the 2007 Christa McAuliffe Excellence in Teacher Education Award presented by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities.
“Wells Fargo fully believes that supporting education is one of the most important investments we can make in our country’s future,” said Rusty Edwards, area business banking manager for Wells Fargo’s Triad and WNC regions. “We are honored to work together with educational organizations like WCU to help create a competitive workforce and a sustainable economy for generations to come.”
Frank Lockwood, WCU associate professor of entrepreneurship and innovation, provided data and research about underserved and underrepresented students that were used in the university’s proposal submitted to Wells Fargo in support of the most recent gift.

WCU’s A.J. Grube elected Southern Conference president

A.J. Grube, Western Carolina University’s faculty athletics representative, was elected president of the Southern Conference at the intercollegiate athletics association’s annual spring meetings recently in Hilton Head, South Carolina.

Grube, director of WCU’s School of Accounting, Finance, Information Systems and Business Law, will serve a two-year term, effective June 1. She has served as vice president of the Southern Conference for the past two years, with Chip Taylor from the Citadel serving as president.

“The Southern Conference is one of a few conferences where the faculty athletics representatives serve as the officers of the conference and, hence, cast his or her institution’s vote when needed. Most conferences don’t work this way,” she said. “I’m truly excited about this opportunity.”

A faculty member at WCU since 1999, Grube also was recently named to the NCAA legislative committee, a 19-member group whose primary responsibility is to review and make recommendations regarding the merits of proposals developed through the association’s shared governance process.

She chaired a campuswide review committee a decade ago that led WCU’s yearlong NCAA recertification process, culminating in notice of unconditional certification of the university’s intercollegiate athletics programs in March 2005.

Formerly assistant vice chancellor for operations and research in the Division of Academic Affairs, Grube earned her doctorate at Florida State University, master’s degrees at Georgia College & State University and Georgia Southern University, and bachelor’s degree at Georgia College & State University.

The Southern Conference is an NCAA Division I conference with headquarters in Spartanburg, South Carolina. In addition to WCU, its members are the Citadel, East Tennessee State University, Furman University, Mercer University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Samford University, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Virginia Military Institute and Wofford College.

The conference’s four-day meetings, which concluded Friday, May 29, were attended by the institutional presidents and chancellors, athletic directors, senior women administrators and faculty athletic representatives. The league’s football and men’s and women’s basketball coaches also held meetings.

In addition to the election of Grube as president, Wofford’s Jameica Hill was selected as vice president. Nayef Samhat of Wofford was elected chairman of the Council of Presidents for 2015-16 while Brian Noland of ETSU was chosen to serve as the vice chairman.

The conference also finalized sites for select championships. Sites for men’s soccer, women’s soccer and volleyball were selected through 2018.
ETSU, Samford and Mercer were chosen as host sites for women’s soccer, while UNCG, Mercer and ETSU were selected on the men’s side. Western Carolina and UNCG were tabbed to host the volleyball tournament in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

WCU Announces Summer Concert Series

The rock trio American Gonzos will kick off WCU’s Summer Concert Series on Thursday, June 11. The Asheville-based musicians are (from left) Michael Dean, Toby Burleson and Andrew Thelston. Dean and Thelston are WCU alumni.

The rock trio American Gonzos will kick off WCU’s Summer Concert Series on Thursday, June 11. The Asheville-based musicians are (from left) Michael Dean, Toby Burleson and Andrew Thelston. Dean and Thelston are WCU alumni.

The 2015 Summer Concert Series at Western Carolina University gets underway Thursday, June 11, with a free performance featuring the rock trio American Gonzos.
The Asheville-based musicians will take the stage at 7 p.m. at WCU’s Central Plaza. Those attending are encouraged to bring blankets or chairs for comfortable seating.
American Gonzo includes two WCU alumni from the class of 2009 – Andrew Thelston, guitarist and lead vocalist, and Michael Dean, who plays bass and provides backup vocals. The third member of the trio is Toby Burleson, drummer and backup vocalist.
Known for their musicianship and catchy tunes, members of the trio say they gather inspiration from many genres of music, including rock, funk, punk and alternative. The band was organized in 2010, and in 2011 the three musicians released their self-titled debut album, which was followed by their second album, “No Way to Live,” in 2013. The band members are currently working on a new collection of songs with longtime producer Randall Harris.
All concerts in the free series are scheduled for 7 p.m. on Thursdays in June and July. Upcoming acts include Bubonik Funk, June 25; Doug Gibson, July 16; Buchanan Boys, July 23; and Steph Stewart and the Boyfriends, July 30. The rain location for all the events is Illusions in A.K. Hinds University Center.

Governor seeks support for bond package, $114.9 million for WCU science building

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory visited Western Carolina University on Friday, May 22, seeking support for his proposed $3 billion bond package that would fund state infrastructure improvements and transportation projects, a plan that would include $114.9 million for a new WCU science building.

McCrory told a standing-room-only crowd assembled in a laboratory in WCU’s existing Natural Science Building, which was originally built in the 1970s and is no longer considered suitable for science education, that the time for the bond issue is now because of low interest rates and growing infrastructure needs.

“It’s not if you need a new building, it’s when are you going to do it. The longer you wait, the more expensive it’s going to get, and the less productivity you’re going to have with your students,” he said, pointing out broken ceiling tiles and antiquated lab equipment. “These in the real estate world would be considered D-minus buildings, which would be torn down.”

In his plan, titled “Connect NC,” McCrory has proposed nearly $3 billion in bond issues for state projects, with about half of that amount to fund highway improvements and the other half to pay for other infrastructure, renovation and construction projects across the state, including $504 million for the University of North Carolina system.

The $114.9 million proposed for WCU would be used to replace a building constructed when the university had only 15 nursing majors and no engineering majors. Today, WCU has about 2,300 students in health and human sciences programs, nearly 600 in technology and engineering programs, and about 500 in biological and physical science programs.

McCrory said he understands the need for educational improvements in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (often called the STEM programs) because of the competition he sees from other states in recruiting business and industry.

“There is a skills gap in our country and in North Carolina, and as I’m recruiting industry to come to North Carolina, including to Western North Carolina, the first question I’m asked is ‘Do you have the talent necessary to fill the jobs at all levels.’ If you can’t answer yes to that question, they will go to another state or to another country,” he said.

“If we don’t get the scientists, if we don’t get the engineers, if we don’t get the mechanics and if we don’t get the electricians, then we’re not going to keep the industry that we have in North Carolina, let alone attract industry to North Carolina,” he said.

McCrory also reminded the crowd that North Carolina recently passed Michigan to become the ninth most-populated state in the nation. “And we’re going to keep growing,” he said. “We have a choice – do we prepare for that growth, or do we react to that growth? And that’s where I think government has a role in preparing its infrastructure.”

WCU Chancellor David O. Belcher thanked McCrory for his endorsement of a new science building at WCU, calling the visit “an important and significant day for our institution.”

“We cannot adequately express our appreciation for affirming us as an institution through your understanding of the integral role this institution plays in the economy of Western North Carolina and your belief in our further potential to deepen and strengthen our impact on this part of the state in helping this wonderful part of our state to achieve the kind of economic vitality of some of our urban sisters in this state,” Belcher said.

Belcher expressed appreciation to members of the legislature, including Rep. Chuck McGrady and Sen. Tom Apodaca, both of Hendersonville, for their support of the project, reading a letter from Apodaca, a WCU alumnus and former member of the WCU Board of Trustees.

“As an advocate of STEM education, I am excited to see this idea gaining attention and support,” Apodaca wrote. “I am encouraged by the support for this important project, and hope that any future bond package will address such needs of Western Carolina and its students. While the bond discussion will continue, and may ultimately be decided by voters, I am glad to see the interests of Western Carolina recognized as integral to our state’s long-term success.”

For the bond package to become reality, the proposal must be endorsed by the General Assembly to be placed on the ballot for November’s elections, and then approved by voters statewide.

Also participating in a discussion of the proposed bond issue were State Budget Director Lee Roberts; Nick Tennyson, deputy secretary of the N.C. Department of Transportation Secretary; Teresa Williams, chair of the WCU Board of Trustees; other university and community leaders; and WCU student Mariah James, a junior biology major characterized by Belcher as “the most person here” because she represented the students who study in the building.

After the discussion, McCrory and the group took a brief tour of the Natural Sciences Building. That was followed by a visit to the WCU steam plant, which was built in the 1920s and is in need of significant renovations, as an example of the extensive amount of repair and renovation funding needs throughout the entire UNC system.

WCU has $511 million impact on WNC economy, statewide study of education says

Western Carolina University was responsible for injecting an estimated $511.3 million into the Western North Carolina economy during the 2012-13 fiscal year through the combined impact of payroll, operational, construction and research expenditures by the university and the spending habits of its students, visitors and alumni.

That is among the findings of a comprehensive study conducted by Economic Modeling Specialists International to examine the impact of higher education on North Carolina. The EMSI study examined the combined impact of the University of North Carolina system, North Carolina Community College system and private institutions, and also assessed the impact of individual UNC campuses, private colleges and community colleges on their local economies.

Western Carolina’s estimated impact of $511.3 million represents approximately 2.7 percent of the total gross regional product for the 10 counties examined in the WCU regional study – Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain and Transylvania. The added regional income created by WCU is equivalent to creating 10,475 new jobs, the study indicates.

In addition, the study calculates the return on investment in WCU for students, society and taxpayers, finding that for every dollar students invest in their educations, they will receive $2.90 in higher future income. From a statewide societal perspective, for each dollar that society spent on education at WCU in the year analyzed, North Carolina will receive a cumulative value of $10.60 in benefits such as savings related to reduced crime, lower unemployment and increased health and well-being across the state.

For every dollar invested by state and local taxpayers to support the operations of WCU in the 2012-13 fiscal year, those taxpayers gained $5.40 in added tax revenues collected and public sector savings, the EMSI researchers said. Specifically, taxpayers contributed $85 million toward WCU that year, while the added tax revenue stemming from students’ higher lifetime incomes and increased output of businesses totaled $358.6 million, with another $103.6 million in benefits because of reduced demand for government-funded services, the study revealed.

“It has been no secret that Western Carolina University and our UNC system, community college and private institution partners in higher education are engines of economic and community development for the communities and regions we serve,” WCU Chancellor David O. Belcher said.

“It is heartening to read the results of this study, which clearly demonstrates the incredible value that WCU and other institutions bring to the state and to the region. I trust that elected officials, taxpayers, students, parents, alumni, donors, and the business community will appreciate the exceptional return on investment our state and region receive when they invest in higher education, whether through appropriations, tax dollars, tuition and fees, or charitable contributions,” Belcher said.

Other findings from the EMSI report about the impact of WCU on the regional economy in the year of the study:

* Research at WCU generated $849,700 in added regional income, which is equivalent to creating 15 new jobs.

* Construction spending by WCU was $2.3 million, equivalent to 79 new jobs.

* About 67 percent of the undergraduate and graduate students at WCU originated from outside the 10-county region. Spending by those students who relocated to the region added approximately $39.9 million to the regional economy, equivalent to 895 new jobs.

* Out-of-region visitors attracted to WNC because of activities at WCU spent about $34.8 million at hotels, restaurants, gas stations and other regional businesses, equivalent to creating 897 new jobs.

* The accumulated contribution of WCU alumni who are employed in the 10-county region amounted to $266.7 million in added regional income, equivalent to creating 5,643 new jobs.

Leaders from WCU, UNC Asheville and Asheville Buncombe Technical Community College gathered Friday, Feb. 20, at the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce to discuss the impacts of their respective institutions – and of Blue Ridge, Haywood, Southwestern and Tri-County community colleges – on the communities that that they serve.

Belcher, UNC Asheville Chancellor Mary K. Grant and A-B Tech President Dennis F. King announced that public higher education institutions in WNC were responsible for injecting at least $2 billion into the state and regional economy during the 2012-13 fiscal year through their institutional expenditures and the spending habits of their students, visitors and alumni. Of that $2 billion, roughly 75 percent ($1.52 billion) stays in the 11 counties of WNC (Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, Swain and Transylvania), they said.

“I am a proud product of North Carolina’s public higher education system, as are my wife and my children, so I know first-hand of the value that the UNC system and the North Carolina Community College system bring to the people of North Carolina,” said N.C. Sen. Tom Apodaca, a 1980 graduate of WCU.

“From laid-off factory workers seeking retraining at their local community colleges so they can re-enter the workforce of the 21st century to first-generation college students finding a welcoming environment at our regional universities, the people of our communities benefit tremendously from public higher education,” Apodaca said. “The results of this economic impact study also show the impact that these institutions are having on our state and regional businesses and on society as a whole.”

The meeting of regional leaders of public higher education followed on the heels of a Feb. 18 announcement of the statewide impact of the UNC and community college systems and private institutions. That statewide study reported the UNC system alone, including campuses and affiliated medical institutions, created $27.9 billion in added state income, which is equal to approximately 6.4 percent of the total Gross State Product of North Carolina and is equivalent to creating 426,052 new jobs.

Looking at the statewide picture, WCU created $901.8 million in additional income in North Carolina during the 2012-13 fiscal year, an economic impact equivalent to creating 15,381 new jobs.

The EMSI researchers say that initial spending by colleges and universities on payroll, operations or goods and services creates a multiplier effect across other businesses throughout the state and regional economy. Data and methods used in the study are based on several sources, including the 2012-13 academic and financial reports from the campuses, industry and employment data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau, and a variety of studies and surveys relating education to social behavior.

Researchers say the study applies a conservative methodology and follows standard practice using only the most recognized indicators of investment effect and economic impact.

For a copy of the full report, including a description of the data and methods used, visit the University of North Carolina website at www.northcarolina.edu/economic-impact-2015.

For more information about WCU’s regional economic impact, a printable PDF is available at www.wcu.edu/WebFiles/PDFs/15-123-Economic-Impact-Report-Western-Version.pdf.

WNC entrepreneurs win $7,000 in prize money at WCU innovation conference

Entrepreneurs and owners of existing small businesses from Asheville, Sylva and Hickory shared $7,000 in prize money to help launch or grow their companies during the inaugural LEAD:Innovation conference Wednesday, April 22, at Western Carolina University.

Billed as kinder, gentler versions of the hit TV show “Shark Tank,” competitions included the “Bright Ideas Rocket Pitches” event, a series of fast-paced proposals from entrepreneurs and inventors aimed at potential investors, and the “Promising Business Acceleration” contest, in which owners of promising existing businesses make proposals for additional capital to accelerate growth.

Paul Hedgecock of Asheville won first prize of $2,500 in the “Bright Ideas Rocket Pitch” competition for his pitch for Ugo Tour, a travel and tourism smartphone app for Western North Carolina points of interest.

Second place and $1,000 went to Emily Edmonds of Sylva for her concept for WNC Brewhub, a proposal to establish a shared beer production and distribution facility for breweries across the region.

In the “Promising Business Acceleration” competition, Ted and Flori Pate of Asheville claimed first prize and $2,500 to build their business Local Flavor, which provides a free app for smartphones that promotes only local, non-franchise businesses.

Steward and Tammy Cook of Hickory took second prize and $1,000 for Cook Consulting App Garden University, a virtual training tool that provides training for substitute teachers customized for individual school districts.

The LEAD:Innovation conference included nine “Bright Ideas Rocket Pitches” and six “Promising Business Acceleration” presentations, said Ed Wright, WCU associate professor of global management and strategy and among the event organizers.

“The subjects of the pitches were quite varied, ranging from an online physicians’ tele-health start-up to new products for stroke rehabilitation,” Wright said. “Overall, the quality of the pitches was excellent, and we look forward to doing this event on a larger scale next year.”

About 100 entrepreneurs, prospective entrepreneurs, investors and others interested in the economic development of Western North Carolina attended the entrepreneurship and small business summit.

The conference was part of a series of scheduled “spin-off events” from November’s LEAD:WNC, a one-day summit convened by WCU to discuss solutions leading to sustainable economic and community development.

WCU establishing for-profit LLC to spur economic development in WNC

The Western Carolina University College of Business is establishing a new, for-profit limited liability company designed to provide entrepreneurial business, scientific and technical services to help spur economic development activity in Western North Carolina.
Formation of the new entity, authorized earlier this year by the University of North Carolina Board of Governors, was announced Wednesday, April 22, as part of WCU’s inaugural LEAD:Innovation summit. More than 100 entrepreneurs, investors, small business owners and others interested in regional economic development gathered on campus for a conference focused on topics related to entrepreneurship and small businesses.

The new for-profit LLC will replace WCU’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, which was created in 2007 within the College of Business to serve as a catalyst for the creation of successful entrepreneurial ventures in WNC while providing hands-on learning experiences for WCU students.

The new entity will be wholly owned by the Western Carolina University Research and Development Corporation, which was formed in 2001 for the purpose of aiding and promoting the educational and charitable purposes of WCU.

Once the for-profit entity is fully established, university officials will identify a manager to run its day-to-day operations. Ed Wright, director of the CEI, will be entity’s faculty contact.

Music of the Carpenters to come to life April 26 at WCU’s Bardo Center

The music of one of America’s top-selling duos of all time, the Carpenters, will come to life as Western Carolina University’s John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center plays host to “We’ve Only Just Begun: Carpenters Remembered” on Sunday, April 26.

The production, which begins at 3 p.m., is the final presentation of WCU’s 2014-15 Galaxy of Stars series.

The sister-and-brother duo of Karen and Richard Carpenter sold more than 100 million records in just over a decade and still hold the record for the most top 10 singles in a row. The combination of Karen’s voice and Richard’s compositions and arrangements created Grammy-winning magic, said Paul Lormand, director of the Bardo Arts Center.

The 90-minute tribute show will feature pop music classics including “For All We Know,” “Goodbye to Love,” “Hurting Each Other,” “I Need to Be in Love,” “Please Mr. Postman,” “Rainy Days and Mondays,” “Superstar,” “There’s a Kind of Hush,” “(They Long to Be) Close to You,” “Top of the World,” “We’ve Only Just Begun,” “Yesterday Once More” and many more.

Led by Michelle Berting Brett and accompanied by a live band of versatile Nashville musicians, “Carpenters Remembered” re-creates the Carpenters’ original sound. In addition, Brett shares stories culled from extensive research and interviews with those who knew Karen and Richard personally and professionally “to provide a real behind-the-scenes look at this pop music phenomenon,” Lormand said.

“Michelle Berting Brett sounds as close to Karen Carpenter as you can get. Beautiful voice, music and show,” he said.

Tickets for the WCU show are $21 for adults ($15 in groups of 20 or more), $16 for WCU faculty and staff members, and $7 for students/children of any age. They may be purchased at the Bardo Arts Center box office, by calling 828-227-2479 or visiting the website bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

“Carpenters Remembered” is sponsored by Bear Lake Reserve and 540-AM WRGC Radio.

Harvey Gantt to keynote April 10 symposium at WCU

Harvey Gantt for newspapersHarvey Gantt, an architect and civil rights activist who formerly served as mayor of Charlotte and was a candidate for the U.S. Senate, will be the keynote speaker for a daylong symposium at Western Carolina University – “North Carolina in Dialogue: Our Past, Present and Future.”

Set for 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, April 10, the interdisciplinary symposium will provide a platform for the public and WCU’s students, faculty and staff to learn from a lineup of distinguished scholars and public activists and intellectuals who will offer perspectives on North Carolina’s history, politics and culture, said Rob Ferguson, an assistant professor in WCU’s Department of History who co-organized the event with Chris Cooper, head of WCU’s Department of Political Science and Public Affairs.

“Our hope is that we have brought together a wide array of scholars and activists who can offer thoughtful and compelling perspectives on our state,” Ferguson said. “Perhaps more importantly, we want the audience to engage the panelists and each other in productive dialogue regarding the future of North Carolina.”

Cooper said the symposium will offer an impressive and diverse lineup of speakers. “I’m looking forward to hearing their perspectives on North Carolina’s past and present, and I hope that this conference can play a small role in helping shape the future of our state,” he said.

Panel sessions will address issues such a public education, farming and foodways, social change, and politics and voting rights. Panelists will include June Atkinson, N.C. superintendent of public instruction; Elizabeth Engelhardt, the John Shelton Reed Professor of Southern Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; David Cunningham, professor and chair of the sociology department at Brandeis University; Dan Carter, professor emeritus in the history department at the University of South Carolina; and J. Peder Zane, chair of the journalism and mass communications department at St. Augustine’s University and contributor to the Raleigh News and Observer.

The event is free and open to everyone. Individuals planning to attend are asked to register at the event website, which can be accessed by visiting pdp.wcu.edu and clicking on the event link. The website includes a detailed schedule of activities that will be held in the Blue Ridge Hall Conference Room and Grandroom at A.K. Hinds University Center.

The symposium is being sponsored by WCU’s Office of Undergraduate Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Department of History, Department of Political Science and Public Affairs, Public Policy Institute, and Office of Continuing and Professional Education.

WCU’s Alexander Macaulay named among UNC system’s top teachers

Alexander Macaulay, associate professor of history at Western Carolina University, has been named one of the best teachers in the University of North Carolina system in recognition of his ability to convince students that history is more than just the memorization of dates and the study of accomplishments of “dead white men.”

Macaulay, a member of the WCU faculty since 2004, is among 17 recipients of the 2015 UNC Board of Governors Awards for Excellence in Teaching, announced Monday, March 23.

A member of the Board of Governors is scheduled to present the award at WCU’s undergraduate commencement ceremonies that begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 9. Macaulay also will speak at the Graduate School commencement ceremony Friday, May 8.

The UNC committee noted that Macaulay regularly wins rave reviews for being a dynamic teacher who combines the qualities of a gifted storyteller, engaging discussion leader and rigorous academician, prompting many students to continue studying history beyond their undergraduate years.

“Dr. Macaulay demonstrates that he reads every word of the assignments he grades. His comments are thoughtful and concise, and students end up not only with assessments of their work but also with feedback that is useful in developing them as writers and as thinkers,” said 2014 graduate Joshua Wilkey, a WCU master’s degree student in history planning to earn a doctorate and teach at the university level. “Dr. Macaulay is the sort of professor who pushes students to unlock their potential.”

Kaylynn Washnock, a doctoral student at the University of Georgia, applauded Macaulay’s availability and open-door policy. “Dr. Macaulay is concerned with both the intellectual and personal development of his students. He takes an interest in his students and their well-being long after time in the classroom has ended,” Washnock said. “Even when I was no longer in his class, Dr. Macaulay would suggest stories for my projects and spend time brainstorming future research topics with me. He truly understands what teaching is all about.”

Macaulay’s faculty colleagues praise his ability to engage students – many of them confessing to not liking the subject of history because they don’t think it matters – in dynamic classroom activities that make history relevant to their lives.

He has linked historical lynchings with more modern cases of institutional violence and injustice, and has shown the connection between late 19th-century labor unions and contemporary issues of free market economy and workplace regulation, said Elizabeth McRae, associate professor of history. “Over and over, students leave his classroom engaged in issues that began for them as facts to memorize about a distant past but ended with them critically analyzing the thorny political issues of both the past and present,” McRae said. “And it is those debates and those discussions that they tell other students about, who then decide to take his class.”

Macaulay’s interest in oral history has led to his students recording histories of veterans of World War II, the Vietnam War and recent conflicts in the Middle East; members of the Jackson County African-American community; residents forced to leave their homes when the construction of Fontana Dam flooded their communities; and long-time residents of Sylva in connection with the town’s recent 125th anniversary celebration.

That work has resulted in the launching of an Appalachian Oral History Project modeled after UNC-Chapel Hill’s Southern Oral History Project. The new project, a collaboration with WCU’s Hunter Library and Special Collections, involves Smoky Mountain High School students who, after training, will conduct the first oral histories for the effort.

In addition to oral history, Macaulay teaches classes in 20th-century U.S. history, the American South, U.S. cultural history, U.S. diplomatic history and gender history. He is author of the book “Marching in Step: Masculinity, Citizenship and the Citadel in Post-World War II America” and numerous articles, book chapters and professional papers.

“I seek out familiar, yet nontraditional topics and sources that will not only pique students’ interests, but also alert them to ways they can analyze and understand the past and the present,” Macaulay said. “For those who believe history is the study of dates and ‘dead white men,’ they learn that history is made by millions of ordinary and extraordinary people who live both everyday and exceptional lives. It also helps me democratize the past and the classroom, encouraging contributions from those who may not know about Alger Hiss, but do know about Elvis Presley.”

The 2011 recipient of WCU’s Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award, he received his bachelor’s degree from the Citadel, master’s degree from the University of Tennessee and doctorate from the University of Georgia.

Macaulay and the other recipients of the UNC honor, representing an array of academic disciplines, were nominated by special committees on their home campuses and selected by the Board of Governors Committee on Personnel and Tenure. Established by the Board of Governors in April 1994 to underscore the importance of teaching and to reward good teaching across the university, the awards are given annually to a tenured faculty member from each UNC campus. Winners must have taught at their present institutions at least seven years. No one may receive the award more than once.

WCU board approves tailgating changes for 2015 football season

There will be more places to tailgate at Western Carolina University home football games this fall.

The WCU Board of Trustees unanimously approved a revision to the university’s tailgating policy that adds an additional parking lot to areas in which alcohol may be consumed on campus as part of fans’ pregame festivities. Approval of the change came during the board’s regularly scheduled quarterly meeting Friday, March 6.

Beginning this fall, the Belk Building parking lot, which previously had been designated as an alcohol-free zone, will be among the alcohol-permissible tailgating areas.

The move became necessary because of increased interest in pregame tailgating at WCU in the wake of recent improvements to the football program. In 2014, the WCU football team enjoyed its first winning regular season since 2005, earning a second-place finish in Southern Conference play.

With the revision to the policy, parking lots at the H.F. Robinson Administration Building, John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center, Camp Building, Jordan-Phillips Field House, Ramsey Center, E.J. Whitmire Stadium, Hennon Baseball Stadium and Belk Building are considered alcohol-permissible areas during approved tailgating hours.

Lots located at Walker and Scott halls remain alcohol-free tailgating areas.

Tailgating at WCU may begin no earlier than three-and-a-half hours before kickoff of the football game. Consumption of alcohol must be discontinued at the start of the game, and tailgating without alcohol beverages may continue after the game for a period of two hours.

Only malt beverages (beers and other brewed libations) and unfortified wine are allowed in approved tailgate areas. Spirituous liquor and kegs or other common-source containers are not permitted.

Campus officials vigorously enforce laws regarding underage consumption of alcohol.

WCU has $511 million impact on WNC economy, statewide study of education says

Western Carolina University was responsible for injecting an estimated $511.3 million into the Western North Carolina economy during the 2012-13 fiscal year through the combined impact of payroll, operational, construction and research expenditures by the university and the spending habits of its students, visitors and alumni.

That is among the findings of a comprehensive study conducted by Economic Modeling Specialists International to examine the impact of higher education on North Carolina. The EMSI study examined the combined impact of the University of North Carolina system, North Carolina Community College system and private institutions, and also assessed the impact of individual UNC campuses, private colleges and community colleges on their local economies.

Western Carolina’s estimated impact of $511.3 million represents approximately 2.7 percent of the total gross regional product for the 10 counties examined in the WCU regional study – Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain and Transylvania. The added regional income created by WCU is equivalent to creating 10,475 new jobs, the study indicates.

In addition, the study calculates the return on investment in WCU for students, society and taxpayers, finding that for every dollar students invest in their educations, they will receive $2.90 in higher future income. From a statewide societal perspective, for each dollar that society spent on education at WCU in the year analyzed, North Carolina will receive a cumulative value of $10.60 in benefits such as savings related to reduced crime, lower unemployment and increased health and well-being across the state.

For every dollar invested by state and local taxpayers to support the operations of WCU in the 2012-13 fiscal year, those taxpayers gained $5.40 in added tax revenues collected and public sector savings, the EMSI researchers said. Specifically, taxpayers contributed $85 million toward WCU that year, while the added tax revenue stemming from students’ higher lifetime incomes and increased output of businesses totaled $358.6 million, with another $103.6 million in benefits because of reduced demand for government-funded services, the study revealed.

“It has been no secret that Western Carolina University and our UNC system, community college and private institution partners in higher education are engines of economic and community development for the communities and regions we serve,” WCU Chancellor David O. Belcher said.

“It is heartening to read the results of this study, which clearly demonstrates the incredible value that WCU and other institutions bring to the state and to the region. I trust that elected officials, taxpayers, students, parents, alumni, donors, and the business community will appreciate the exceptional return on investment our state and region receive when they invest in higher education, whether through appropriations, tax dollars, tuition and fees, or charitable contributions,” Belcher said.

Other findings from the EMSI report about the impact of WCU on the regional economy in the year of the study:

* Research at WCU generated $849,700 in added regional income, which is equivalent to creating 15 new jobs.

* Construction spending by WCU was $2.3 million, equivalent to 79 new jobs.

* About 67 percent of the undergraduate and graduate students at WCU originated from outside the 10-county region. Spending by those students who relocated to the region added approximately $39.9 million to the regional economy, equivalent to 895 new jobs.

* Out-of-region visitors attracted to WNC because of activities at WCU spent about $34.8 million at hotels, restaurants, gas stations and other regional businesses, equivalent to creating 897 new jobs.

* The accumulated contribution of WCU alumni who are employed in the 10-county region amounted to $266.7 million in added regional income, equivalent to creating 5,643 new jobs.

Leaders from WCU, UNC Asheville and Asheville Buncombe Technical Community College gathered Friday, Feb. 20, at the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce to discuss the impacts of their respective institutions – and of Blue Ridge, Haywood, Southwestern and Tri-County community colleges – on the communities that that they serve.

Belcher, UNC Asheville Chancellor Mary K. Grant and A-B Tech President Dennis F. King announced that public higher education institutions in WNC were responsible for injecting at least $2 billion into the state and regional economy during the 2012-13 fiscal year through their institutional expenditures and the spending habits of their students, visitors and alumni. Of that $2 billion, roughly 75 percent ($1.52 billion) stays in the 11 counties of WNC (Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, Swain and Transylvania), they said.

“I am a proud product of North Carolina’s public higher education system, as are my wife and my children, so I know first-hand of the value that the UNC system and the North Carolina Community College system bring to the people of North Carolina,” said N.C. Sen. Tom Apodaca, a 1980 graduate of WCU.

“From laid-off factory workers seeking retraining at their local community colleges so they can re-enter the workforce of the 21st century to first-generation college students finding a welcoming environment at our regional universities, the people of our communities benefit tremendously from public higher education,” Apodaca said. “The results of this economic impact study also show the impact that these institutions are having on our state and regional businesses and on society as a whole.”

The meeting of regional leaders of public higher education followed on the heels of a Feb. 18 announcement of the statewide impact of the UNC and community college systems and private institutions. That statewide study reported the UNC system alone, including campuses and affiliated medical institutions, created $27.9 billion in added state income, which is equal to approximately 6.4 percent of the total Gross State Product of North Carolina and is equivalent to creating 426,052 new jobs.

Looking at the statewide picture, WCU created $901.8 million in additional income in North Carolina during the 2012-13 fiscal year, an economic impact equivalent to creating 15,381 new jobs.

The EMSI researchers say that initial spending by colleges and universities on payroll, operations or goods and services creates a multiplier effect across other businesses throughout the state and regional economy. Data and methods used in the study are based on several sources, including the 2012-13 academic and financial reports from the campuses, industry and employment data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau, and a variety of studies and surveys relating education to social behavior.

Researchers say the study applies a conservative methodology and follows standard practice using only the most recognized indicators of investment effect and economic impact.

For a copy of the full report, including a description of the data and methods used, visit the University of North Carolina website at www.northcarolina.edu/economic-impact-2015.

For more information about WCU’s regional economic impact, a printable PDF is available at www.wcu.edu/WebFiles/PDFs/15-123-Economic-Impact-Report-Western-Version.pdf.

WCU College of Health and Human Sciences opens pro bono physical therapy clinic

The College of Health and Human Sciences at Western Carolina University has launched a pro bono clinic to provide physical therapy services to underserved and underinsured populations of Western North Carolina.

The clinic, operated by students in WCU’s doctoral program in physical therapy under the supervision of faculty members, is open from 6 until 8:30 p.m. on the first and third Wednesdays of every month. It is located in Carolina West Sports Medicine clinic space on the first floor of the Health and Human Sciences Building on Little Savannah Road on WCU’s West Campus.

The physical therapy clinic is among several clinics located in WCU’s Health and Human Sciences Building that are designed to provide much-needed health care services to WNC residents while giving students in the health care professions valuable hands-on learning experiences, said Doug Keskula, dean of the College of Health and Human Sciences.

“Through the new physical therapy clinic and other clinics in our building, we are able to deliver exceptional health services to our community while simultaneously supporting the education and development of the highly skilled health professionals of the future,” Keskula said.

“The truly extraordinary aspect of this clinic is that it is a student-led initiative,” he said. “Our physical therapy students have been involved in creating and implementing every aspect of this much-needed clinic. Under the guidance of faculty member and clinic director Dr. Ashley Hyatt, our students are learning the professional roles of patient advocacy and social responsibility firsthand.”

Hyatt, who joined the WCU faculty in 2013, has previous experience working in a pro bono clinic during her years in graduate school. “I participated both as a student and as a supervising clinician, and I was able to see firsthand how beneficial the clinic was to the community,” she said.

Soon after her arrival on campus, Hyatt began working on a proposal for a clinic at WCU. Students in the physical therapy program formed a student board to develop plans for the clinic, under the supervision of an advisory board composed of faculty and staff from WCU as well as community partners.

“It has been very exciting to see all of the hard work that these students have put into this clinic come to fruition. It is also really rewarding to see our students apply what they have learned in the classroom to actual patients who truly need their help,” Hyatt said. “We all learn something each clinic night, and this will be a constant work in progress. We would like to start expanding the clinic to other professions in the college once we get a bit more comfortable.”

Last September, WestCare Center for Family Medicine launched a new full-time primary care clinic in the building. That clinic occupies 2,000 square feet within the 160,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility.

In December 2013, Carolina West Sports Medicine opened a rehabilitation and sports medicine clinic in the building, providing services to the community and clinical practice opportunities for WCU faculty and students. The building’s interdisciplinary clinic also hosts WCU’s nationally recognized Speech and Hearing Clinic, the Balance and Fall Prevention Clinic, and Vecinos Farmworker Health Program.

Opened in the fall of 2012, the Health and Human Sciences Building is the first facility built on 344 acres across N.C. Highway 107 from the main campus that were acquired by WCU in 2005 as part of the Millennial Initiative. A comprehensive regional economic development strategy, the Millennial Initiative promotes university collaboration with private industry and government partners to enhance hands-on student learning and collaborative research.

In addition, the Board of Trustees of the Endowment Fund of Western Carolina University recently issued a request for qualifications for a project to develop a medical office building to be constructed near the university’s Health and Human Sciences Building.

The office building will be the first privately developed structure to be built on the West Campus as part of the Millennial Initiative. Expected to encompass at least 30,000 square feet of space, the building will become home to a mix of office space for health care professionals, along with space for health-related businesses.

The Mountain Area Pro Bono Physical Therapy Clinic is available to individuals who do not have insurance coverage for physical therapy.

Spring enrollment tops 9,800 for first time in WCU history

Thanks to an increase in the percentage of first-time freshmen returning after their initial fall semester of study, total spring enrollment at Western Carolina University has topped 9,800 for the first time in university history.

The spring enrollment high-water mark comes after WCU set another fall enrollment record in September, with 10,382 students on the roll, a 2.7 percent jump in the total student population over the previous fall’s tally.

Preliminary census data compiled by the university’s Office of Institutional Planning and Effectiveness indicates that enrollment for the 2015 spring semester stands at 9,814. That figure represents a 1.7 percent increase over last spring’s enrollment of 9,650, said Tim Metz, assistant vice chancellor for institutional planning and effectiveness.

Spring enrollment numbers at institutions of higher education typically are lower than fall enrollment as some students do not return for a second semester for reasons that range from academic to personal, Metz said.

The increase in spring enrollment is driven, at least in part, by a higher percentage of first-semester freshmen who returned to campus in the spring for a second semester, Metz said. This year’s fall-to-spring freshman retention rate is 92.4 percent, up from the spring 2014 rate of 90 percent.

University officials point to ongoing efforts to increase the number of students who remain at WCU beyond the freshman year as a factor in recent improvements in retention rates, which also are boosting total enrollment. Higher fall-to-spring rates of retention for freshmen typically also indicate that a larger percentage of students will return for their second year of study.

Although the university’s official census day comes after the 10th class day of the semester, enrollment numbers are considered preliminary until they have been submitted to the University of North Carolina General Administration.

World’s best young Elvis’ performs Jan. 31 at WCU

Travis LeDoyt, acclaimed by critics as “the world’s best young Elvis,” will bring his tribute to the king of rock ‘n’ roll to Western Carolina University Saturday, Jan. 31, in honor of what would have been Presley’s 80th birthday.

LeDoyt will hit the stage at 7:30 p.m. at WCU’s John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center, as part of the 2014-15 Galaxy of Stars Series. Presley was born Jan. 8, 1935.

Paul Lormand, director of the Bardo Arts Center, says there are five reasons why LeDoyt wins accolades as the top young Elvis.

“He looks like Elvis, he sings like Elvis, he moves like Elvis, his personality and mannerisms both on and off stage are strikingly similar to Elvis, and he sells out nearly every show,” Lormand said. “To those people who think they have seen it all when it comes to Elvis tribute acts, this is the one that makes them do a double take. There is simply no way to describe Travis and his performance except ‘unbelievable.’”

LeDoyt captures the essence of Elvis in his prime, and restricts his shows to the hits and ambience of 1954 through 1962, Lormand said. Utilizing a three-piece band featuring guitar, bass and drums, LeDoyt takes his audience back to the fun and excitement of a 1950s Elvis concert, he said.

“For those who missed seeing an Elvis concert during those years, it is a chance to relive the excitement and aura of an Elvis show and the fun and energy experienced by the audiences,” Lormand said.

LeDoyt has been selling out shows and receiving accolades from audiences from around the world. He has been on four tours in the United Kingdom and has performed in Hong Kong, China, Chile and Canada.

Tickets for the WCU show are $21 for adults ($15 in groups of 20 or more), $16 for WCU faculty and staff members, and $7 for students/children of any age. Contact the box office at 227-2479 or at bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

WCU students to present mock trial based on Ron Rash novel ‘Serena’

Western Carolina University business law students will present a mock trial based on the Ron Rash novel “Serena” at a courtroom in the Jackson County Justice and Administration Building on Tuesday, Dec. 9.

The event, which lasts three hours and begins at 5 p.m., is free and open to the public.

Rash, an award-winning writer and WCU’s Parris Distinguished Professor of Appalachian Culture, authored “Serena,” and the novel set in Western North Carolina is this year’s selection for the WCU Office of First Year Experience’s One Book program. The program is designed to encourage students to have common intellectual conversation about one book. Freshmen were provided with copies of the novel, which was incorporated into transition courses as well as multiple upper-level courses in a range of disciplines.

Jayne Zanglein, professor of business law, assigned her students to develop a trial based on the characters and a legal issue in “Serena.” They crafted a case set in 1930 titled “Susan Harrill, as spouse ‘ad litem’ on behalf of William Harrill, deceased, Plaintiff v. The Pemberton Lumber Company, Defendant.”

In the lawsuit, Harrill alleges that an agent of the lumber company intentionally cut a cable wire in an attempt to injure or kill her husband.

The mock trial will involve a range of witnesses including the book’s title character, Serena Pemberton, as the wife of the lumber company manager. Exhibits include historical images, detailed information and diagrams of log loaders and equipment, and statistics regarding workplace injuries in the southern United States from pulpwood logging.

For more information, contact Zanglein at 828-227-7191.

WCU Wrapping Up 125th Anniversary Celebration Today

Paws_RunningWestern Carolina University will wrap up the yearlong celebration of the 125th anniversary of its founding with the It’s a Wrap Party at 3 p.m. Friday, Dec. 5, at the Ramsey Center in Cullowhee.

The event will be highlighted by a cross-campus parade led by WCU’s Pride of the Mountains Marching Band, which will have just returned from participating in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Members of the campus and surrounding communities are encouraged to wear their purple-and-gold apparel and join the band in the on-campus march. The It’s a Wrap parade is scheduled to begin at 4 p.m. at Scott Residence Hall and end at the Liston B. Ramsey Regional Activity Center.

WCU To Host Fall Commencement Ceremony

Western Carolina University will hold commencement exercises Saturday, Dec. 13, to honor its fall graduating class and some newly minted WCU alumni who received degrees after this year’s summer school sessions.

The 1 p.m. ceremony at the Ramsey Regional Activity Center is open to everyone and no tickets are required for admission. Chancellor David O. Belcher will preside over commencement and deliver his charge to the fall semester degree candidates and summer graduates.

Graduating student Jill Haley West White of Andrews, a secondary English education major, will deliver the primary commencement address.

WCU’s fall class includes about 800 students who currently are working on final academic requirements to receive their degrees and who qualify to participate in the ceremony. Approximately 140 WCU graduates who completed degree requirements during summer school and who already have been conferred degrees also will be eligible to don caps and gowns for the event.

Individuals attending WCU’s commencement should enter the Ramsey Center through one of four upper concourse doors. Those with physical disabilities should use the northeastern upper entrance, adjacent to the stands of E.J. Whitmire Stadium.

WCU marching band to headline closing event of 125th anniversary celebration

There’s one more parade left on the itinerary this year for members of Western Carolina University’s Pride of the Mountains Marching Band, who opened the 2014 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade just a few days ago.

And the remaining route will be quite a bit different than the trek through the concrete canyons of New York City, as the band will march across the bucolic WCU campus to help wrap up the university’s yearlong celebration of its 125th year of existence.

Titled the “It’s a Wrap Party,” the event is scheduled for Friday, Dec. 5, as the Pride of the Mountains will lead a parade of students and campus organizations from Scott Residence Hall to the Liston B. Ramsey Regional Activity Center, where the band will reprise its Macy’s parade performance.

The “It’s a Wrap Party” also will include remarks from WCU Chancellor David O. Belcher to bring the 125th anniversary year to a close, along with prizes, giveaways, refreshments and special recognition of alumni and students.

Members of the campus and surrounding communities are invited to wear their own sports uniforms, letter jackets or other purple-and-gold apparel and join the band in the cross-campus march. Those who do not wish to participate in the parade may watch the band and others march across campus, or simply arrive at the Ramsey Center and be seated no later than 4:15 p.m. The doors to the Ramsey Center will open at 3 p.m.

The yearlong celebration of WCU’s 125th anniversary began in January as hundreds of people crowded into the Grandroom of the A.K. Hinds University Center for a kickoff event highlighted by a fashion show of clothing from throughout WCU history, modeled by students, faculty, staff and community members.

The official 125th anniversary bash was held Aug. 26, the month in which the school that became WCU was founded in 1889. The event, attended by thousands, included a picnic on the University Center lawn, remarks from elected officials, a concert on the Central Plaza and old-fashioned games.

The majority of the year’s celebration was designed around traditional highlights of WCU’s annual calendar, such as spring commencement ceremonies, Mountain Heritage Day, the Spring Literary Festival, Homecoming and alumni receptions across the state and the Southeast.