Header

Archive for Jackson County

JCDPH PROMOTES ALCOHOL AWARENESS MONTH

Drinking too much alcohol increases people’s risk of injuries, violence, drowning, liver disease, and some types of cancer. This April, during Alcohol Awareness Month, the Jackson County Department of Public Health (JCDPH) encourages you to educate yourself and your loved ones about the dangers of drinking too much and drinking underage.

According to the NC State Center of Health Statistics, more traffic crashes are alcohol-related in Jackson County than in Western North Carolina or North Carolina—29% more than Western North Carolina and 42% more than in North Carolina. To spread the word and prevent alcohol abuse, JCDPH is joining other organizations across the county to honor Alcohol Awareness Month.

If you are drinking too much, you can improve your health by cutting back or quitting. Here are some strategies to help you cut back or stop drinking:
· Limit your drinking to no more than one drink a day for women or two drinks a day for men.
· Keep track of how much you drink.
· Choose a day each week when you will not drink.
· Don’t drink when you are upset.
· Avoid places where people drink a lot.
· Make a list of reasons not to drink.

If you are concerned with underage drinking, a new tool is available. Talk it Out NC is a statewide initiative launched by the ABC Commission to fight back against underage drinking by starting the conversation between parents and youth. Statewide, underage drinking is not only a financial burden to the state, but also results in lives lost, crimes committed, and hundreds of teen pregnancies. This initiative reports that the average age that children in North Carolina take their first drink is 13.9 years and more teens will die as a result of alcohol use than all other illicit drugs combined. Further, in 2009, underage drinking led to 60 murders, 26,800 violent crimes, and 67,400 property crimes. Finally, alcohol use by teens is one of the strongest predictors of teen injury, fighting, academic problems, truancy, unprotected sex, unwanted sexual advanced, illegal activity, and other illicit drug use. These statistics, while alarming, only scratch the surface of the physical, social, and emotional damage that can weigh down teens for the rest of their lives.

For more information on Talk It Out NC, visit the initiative’s website at http://www.talkitoutnc.org/.

SBI Investigation Results in Four Arrests From October Underage Drinking Party in Jackson County

Four people, including a former Jackson County deputy and a jail nurse, were arrested by the State Bureau of Investigation Tuesday in connection with alleged rapes and underage drinking during a Halloween party at a Sylva business in October, 2014.

Michelle Watson Dillard, 40, and James Wesley Henry, 39, both of Sylva, were each indicted Monday by a Jackson County grand jury on one count of obstruction of justice in relation to the alleged incidents.

Dillard was a jail nurse and Henry was a K-9 officer for the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office at the time of this party held at Dillard’s husband’s business, Dillard Excavation.

Dillard and Henry surrendered themselves to SBI agents at the county jail where they were processed. They both appeared before Superior Court Judge Marvin Pope who set their bonds at $10,000 each, though their attorneys argued for unsecured bonds. No court dates have been set for them.

Austin Trent Davis, 19, and Cody Jacob Scott Jenkins, 24, were also indicted by the grand jury yesterday for one count each of felony statutory sex offenses. Their bonds will be set later today and their court date is April 15.

Sheriff Jimmy Ashe requested the assistance of the state Alcohol Law Enforcement Branch to investigate the initial reports of underage drinking received by his department and then later requested the SBI investigate after learning that employees from his department may be involved. The sheriff’s office cooperated fully in this investigation.

Wintry Mix Hits the Region

Snow and Ice hit the region on Monday leaving some without electricity. Photo by Heather L Hyatt

Snow and Ice hit the region on Monday leaving some without electricity. Photo by Heather L Hyatt

As grey skies turned to snow, snow turned to sleet, and sleet turned to ice pellets across the region Monday, area residents stocked up on groceries and essential supplies for the storm.

A layer of ice began to build up on the streets by mid-day Monday, leaving both pedestrians and drivers skidding along the sidewalks and streets.

The State Highway Patrol investigated more than 1,000 accidents since midnight Monday across the state. 31 wrecks were reported in Jackson County on Monday.

According to Duke Energy, power outages were reported across the region:

HAYWOOD – 394 without power
JACKSON – 53 without power
MACON – 531 without power
SWAIN – 79 without power

North Carolina Emergency Services estimated customers without power at noon today: 52,000; down from 63,000 at 10 am. Majority in eastern part of NC.

On Wednesday,temperatures are predicted to drop to single and negative digits. There will be a chance of snow showers throughout the day on Wednesday.

Jackson Neighbors in Need has successful fundraiser

Jackson Neighbors in Need (JNIN) raised more than $8,700 at the second annual Charlie’s Challenge fundraiser on Saturday, January 31.

More than 200 people gathered in the Sylva First Baptist Mission Hall for the event to remember JNIN Founder Charlie McConnell and raise money for the organization’s heating assistance program, an emergency shelter, and weatherization services. All money raised came from generous donations from local residents, community organizations and businesses from the surrounding area.

Jackson Neighbors in Need’s heating assistance program works to ensure that area residents are able to afford heating their homes during the winter. Over the past several years, prices for electricity, fuel oil, and natural gas have risen sharply. At the same time, unemployment has risen and government assistance has fallen. The heating assistance program provides up to $400 worth of assistance per household, per cold weather season.

The organization’s weatherization program is another way local residents in need can get help with heating costs. Weatherization assistance includes minor improvements like installing insulating film to windows, to major projects like replacing rotten floor joists and repairing failing ceilings.

Jackson Neighbors in Need also operates an emergency shelter each year from November 1 – March 31.

NC Schools: Are they making the grade?

All public schools in North Carolina got letter grades from A-F from the State Board of Education Thursday.

Eighty percent of the grades are based on how students performed on standardized tests. Twenty percent of the grades are tied to how much academic growth students showed while enrolled at the school.
About 29 percent of schools got a “D” or “F”. All schools assigned those grades must send a letter to parents informing them.

The statistics show traditional public schools both fail less and shine less than public charter schools. They also show that schools where a majority of students fall below the poverty line overwhelmingly got Ds and Fs.

State education officials said another way to look at the numbers is over two-thirds of schools got a C or better.
On Average Jackson County schools saw a C average with a few exceptions. Jackson Early College received an A while Mountain Discovery saw a B grade.

— Blue Ridge Early College: D.
— Cullowhee Valley School: C.
— Fairview Elementary: C.
— Blue Ridge School: D.
— Scotts Creek Elementary: C.
— Smokey Mountain Elementary: D.
— Smoky Mountain High: C.
— Summit: C

Sheriff’s Office Seeks Help Locating Suspects

Recently the Sheriff’s Office requested assistance from the public in regards to several breaking and enterings and larcenies in the Qualla/Whittier communities of Jackson County. The Sheriff’s Office has obtained arrest warrants for suspects in some of these break ins. Tara Renee Pheasant, aka Tara McCoy, DOB 08/24/1976, and Frank Joseph McCoy, DOB 08/27/1993, have not been located at the time of this release, but the Sheriff’s office is asking for anyone with information about the suspect’s whereabouts to contact our crime stoppers at 828-631-1125 or crimestoppers@jacksonnc.org Frank is the son of Tara Pheasant and both have been charged in Haywood County on similar charges and are out on bond.

Developer sought for medical office building project at WCU

The Board of Trustees of the Endowment Fund of Western Carolina University has issued a request for qualifications for a project to develop a medical office building to be constructed near the university’s Health and Human Sciences Building.

The building will be the first privately developed structure to be built on WCU’s 344-acre West Campus as part of the university’s Millennial Initiative.

Expected to encompass at least 30,000 square feet of space, the building will become home to a mix of office space for health care professionals, along with space for health-related businesses, said Tony Johnson, executive director for the Millennial Initiative.

“We envision this building as a hub of collaboration, where WCU faculty and students will work alongside health care professionals,” Johnson said. “The health care practitioners who locate there will help meet the medical needs of the people of the region, and simultaneously will provide hands-on learning experiences for our students and opportunities for professional practice and research for our faculty.”

The request for qualifications is the initial step in the process of selecting a full-service developer to design, finance, construct and manage a medical office building or similar specialty medical center. Selection of the developer is expected to take place in June, with construction to begin as early as January 2016 and occupancy of the building in early 2017.

The medical office building is anticipated to be the first of five phases of building projects designed to complement the Health and Human Sciences Building as part of the long-range planning for the development of the West Campus, Johnson said.

The area around the HHS Building is expected to become the hub of a health sciences cluster, which will expand collaborative opportunities with partners such as private clinics, medical device companies and other health-related businesses. The partnerships will be intended to enhance hands-on student learning, foster collaborative research and promote development of scientific and technological innovations with potential commercial applications, and provide needed services to the community.

Completion of the medical office building will represent an additional collaboration between WCU and private health care partners. Last September, WestCare Health launched a new full-time primary care clinic in the HHS Building. The clinic occupies 2,000 square feet within the 160,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility.

In December 2013, WestCare opened a rehabilitation and sports medicine clinic in the building, joining Carolina West Sports Medicine, which provides care to the community and collaborates clinically with WCU rehabilitation and sports medicine faculty, staff and students.

Opened in the fall of 2012, the Health and Human Sciences Building is the first facility built on 344 acres across N.C. Highway 107 from the main campus that were acquired by WCU in 2005 as part of the Millennial Initiative. A comprehensive regional economic development strategy, the Millennial Initiative promotes university collaboration with private industry and government partners to enhance hands-on student learning and collaborative research.

The medical office building project is made possible because the WCU Board of Trustees in December 2013 endorsed a proposal to lease the “millennial campus” tract to the university’s Endowment Fund, a move designed to enable WCU to respond rapidly and nimbly to potential public-private economic development opportunities.

The lease proposal was subsequently approved by the University of North Carolina Board of Governors, the governor and the Council of State. It enables WCU to follow a strategic economic development model similar to what is in use at other UNC institutions, including N.C. State University for its Centennial Campus and UNC Charlotte for its Charlotte Research Initiative, where institutional endowment funds already owned tracts prior to their designation as “millennial campuses.”

For more information about the Millennial Initiative, contact Tony Johnson at 828-227-2596 or tonyjohnson@wcu.edu.

Developers interested in the medical office building project can find the request for qualifications online at www.wcu.edu/WebFiles/PDFs/RFQMOBFINAL11215.pdf.

2015 WNC Beer Guide Now Available

The winter/spring release of the WNC Beer Guide has hit the shelves around Western North Carolina.

The WNC Craft Beer Guide is the original “go to” guide for locals and tourists looking to visit the breweries in Asheville and the surrounding areas. It includes maps to the brewery locations, as well as pubs that carry local beer, beer tours, and beer retailers. The guide is an informative resource for those seeking to get a “taste” of Beer City.

The WNC Beer guide is a printed and online resource for visiting beer lovers and Western North Carolina residents. View the online version at http://wncbeer.com.

WNCBeer.com is a resource for reviews, directions, and upcoming events. The beer-curious can search by area, by brewery, by event, or by type of beer and download the beer guide app.

50,000 guidebooks are distributed bi-annually and are available for free at area chambers, hotels, retailers, restaurants and pubs in Asheville, Hendersonville, Black Mountain, Waynesville and Bryson City. For information, call Jami Daniels at 277-8250.

Heating Assistance Available

As winter weather makes headlines nationally, N.C. DHHS wants to remind North Carolinians about the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP). Applications are still being accepted through March 2015 or until funding is exhausted.

LIEAP is a federally-funded program administered in North Carolina through the Department of Health and Human Services. It provides almost $51 million toward helping eligible households pay their heating bills.

Since Dec. 1, the Low Income Energy Assistance Program has provided approximately $24 million to help more than 80,000 households pay their heating bills and stay warm this winter.

“LIEAP is truly a life-saver for many vulnerable North Carolinians,” said David Locklear, Acting Chief for Economic and Family Services for N.C. DHHS’ Division of Social Services. “Energy assistance is critical for homes with someone at risk for a life-threatening illness or death in the cold winter months.”

Nearly half of the households receiving assistance include an occupant aged 60 and above. Others include at least one disabled person (receiving SSI, SSA or VA disability) who receives services through N.C. DHHS’ Division of Aging and Adult Services (DAAS).

To be eligible, households must meet income requirements, have reserves at or below $2,250 and be responsible for paying its own heating bills.

Sheriff’s Office Seeks Assistance in Identifying Male

10942460_868184906565760_8306161362118663428_nThe Jackson County Sheriff’s Office is seeking assistance in identifying a male subject who was involved in passing stolen checks at both the Sylva and Cullowhee State Employee’s Credit Unions on Jan. 14. The subject was driving a black newer model car, seen in the photos. The male was accompanied by an unknown female subject in the passenger seat. Anyone with any information is encouraged to contact Crime Stoppers at 828-631-1125 or crimestoppers@jacksonnc.org

Residents May Face Fire Tax

No correlation just a coincidence—that’s what Chuck Wooten, County Manager says about the talks to levy a fire tax for the Glenville-Cashiers and Cullowhee area residents. This comes just after Macon County Commissioners discussed asking Jackson County to pay them $160,000 annually for emergency services they offer to home owners in the Highlands area.

The homes are located in Jackson County but without a substation in the area, it takes emergency services from Jackson County nearly 25 minutes to reach the homes in question. Macon County emergency services reaches those homes in about 5 minutes.

Glenville Cashiers and Cullowhee Fire Departments have consistently stated that they cannot continue to rely on the expectation of contributions to cover the majority of their budget through fundraisers and donations.

County dollars are distributed to the departments using a base rate plus additional monies for each substation, a total of $1.5 million. Closing the gaps in Cashiers and Cullowhee would require more taxes.

Due to Lower property values in Cullowhee, residents there would face higher tax than required in Cashiers-Glenville to meet the community fire department’s requirements.

In late fall the county was approached by Highlands Fire Department about providing additional support to offset a portion of the costs to operate a new sub-station that would service a number of Jackson County homes and offer them a substantial reduction in homeowners insurance since they would be in their 5 mile response district.

The county was later contacted by a group of residents in the Cullasaja Club who are residents of Jackson County asking for support to Highlands.

Macon County has now followed up with a similar request. For years elected officials in both Macon and Jackson counties have debated where the county line between Cashiers and Highlands falls. With homes in the area valued at millions of dollars, 332 properties are located in the area in question. Although the properties are currently considered to be in Jackson County, the homes receive services from Macon County such as EMS, police, fire, and solid waste. Macon County estimates Jackson receives about $1.2 million annually in property tax revenue from those homes and they are requesting 13% of that number which comes to $160,000 a year to provide those services.

In an email Wooten says as the county is considering Cashiers and Cullowhee, the county thought it would be appropriate to add the Highlands area as well. Wooten says Randy Dillard, fire chief at Cashiers, supports this concept since these home are more easily served by Macon since Cashiers does not have access to some of these properties without going into Macon County and circling back into Jackson County.

The fire tax was proposed previously but dropped when a majority of the departments did not support the tax. A timetable projects extra taxes levied as soon as July. Before that could happen, residents would be notified by mail about the plan and a public hearing held. Commissioners could choose to establish seven fire service areas but tax only the two in question now.

Jackson County Landowners Work with LTLT to Preserve Parkway Viewshed and Create Conserved Land Corridor

(Franklin, NC)—104 acres of forested land in the viewshed of the Blue Ridge Parkway in Jackson County are now conserved thanks to two local landowners and The Land Trust for the Little Tennessee. LTLT worked with landowners Joan Byrd and George Rector to conserve the tract of land in the Bo Cove area of Speedwell, near Cullowhee. The owners donated a conservation easement on their property, which LTLT holds in trust.

This is the second conservation easement that Byrd and Rector have donated to LTLT. The first was a 40-acre tract in the same area, donated in 2006. The new 104-acre easement connects the Nantahala National Forest to the original 40-acre easement, creating a corridor of conserved lands. The newly conserved tract includes miles of forested streams, including a portion of Bryson Branch. The conservation easement permits forest management, small-scale agriculture and the construction of one home, but ensures that the land will not be subdivided or used for a high-density residential or commercial development.

Byrd, a retired professor from Western Carolina University, and Rector, a potter, reside in Cullowhee and are passionate supporters of conservation in western North Carolina. “We both wanted in some way to help preserve the historical, rural character of Jackson County,” said Rector, who himself grew up on 30 acres of farmland in Andrews. “This is one of the fastest growing counties in the region, and as the population increases, it is essential to protect the resources that people will demand in the future: farmland, clean water and healthy forests.”

John Culclasure, LTLT’s Land Protection Manager, was particularly pleased to work on this project. “This project conserves over a mile and a half of forested streams, whose cool waters are important for fish and other aquatic life. The diversity of forest community types is important for wildlife, and the adjacency to the national forest ensures critters have room to roam. George and Joan have made a tremendous contribution to conservation in Jackson County. ”

This project was made possible thanks to funding support from the Conservation Trust for North Carolina.

LTLT is a regional non-profit dedicated to conserving the land and waters in the six far-western North Carolina counties and northern Rabun County, Georgia. LTLT employs 12 staff members who work to sustain quality of life and economic vitality in the mountains

Applications taken for Greening Up the Mountains

Greening Up the Mountains Festival, which brought between 10,000 to 12,000 people to the mountain town of Sylva last year, is now inviting fine artists, mountain crafters and food vendors to apply for a booth in it’s18th year as the premiere spring festival for Western North Carolina. On April 25, 2015, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., the festival sponsored by the Town of Sylva, will once again take place in downtown Sylva, where demonstrating visual artists and traditional crafters will be joined by a mountain community who honors their artisans & natural environment.
Daylong events will be held on Main Street and in the Bridge Park, beginning with a 5K race sponsored by the Jackson County Recreation/Parks Department. Children’s activities, demonstrations, a youth talent contest and live performances by a wide variety of Jackson County musicians will be featured throughout the day.
Applications can be downloaded from the website, www.greeningupthemountains.com, and will be accepted through April 15, 2015. For more information, call 828.631.4587.

Jackson County Passes Fracking Resolution

The Jackson County Commissioners voted unanimously to pass a Resolution opposing hydraulic fracturing (also known as fracking) after a long debate on the subject. Newly elected Chairman Brian McMahan told WRGC after the mid-term elections that the resolution would be his first action in office. Previous Commissioners felt a 2002 heavy industry ordinance in addition to a resolution protecting natural resources was enough to keep Jackson County safe from fracking.

Heating Assistance Still Available

The Jackson County Department of Social Services has announced that Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) funds are still available.

Randal Moss, Supervisor of Emergency Assistance Programs, stated that applications were taken during the month of December for citizens who were either disabled or age 60 or older. However, beginning January 1, all other Jackson County households meeting the income guidelines are eligible for this assistance.

“Only 18% of the available funds have been spent so far,” Moss said. “We feel there are many more people out there who are struggling and who could benefit from this assistance.”

“One-time payments are made to electric companies, fuel oil or LP gas suppliers, firewood providers, and any other source that households use for heat,” Moss said.

Eligibility guidelines for the LIEAP program include the following:
· The household must be responsible for its heating bills.
· The household cannot have financial resources such as checking and savings accounts that are over $2,250.
· The household must include a U.S. citizen or an eligible alien.

Income guidelines are as follows:

No. Eligible In Household
Maximum Countable Income
No. Eligible In Household
Maximum Countable Income
1
$1,265
4
$2,584
2
$1,705
5
$3,024
3
$2,144
6
$3,464

Applications for the LIEAP program will be taken at Social Services through March 31st. For more information, citizens may call 586-5546.

WNC Meth Ring Defendants Sentenced

The last of 18 members of a methamphetamine trafficking ring that operated in Western North Carolina has been sentenced to federal prison.
Angela Leigh Wike, 39, of Bryson City, was sentenced to 46 months in prison and was also ordered to serve three years under court supervision after her release, Anne M. Tompkins, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina, announced Wednesday.

In May of 2013, 18 members of the drug ring were arrested as the result of a joint law enforcement investigation by local, state and federal agencies.

According to filed court documents and court proceedings, from May 2012 to April 2013, the drug ring operated primarily in Jackson, Haywood, Macon, Swain and Buncombe counties

Wike will be transferred to the custody of the Federal Bureau of Prisons upon designation of a federal facility. All federal sentences are served without the possibility of parole. Other sentences in the case ranged from 27 months to more than 12 years in prison.

The investigation was handled by the DEA and ATF, assisted by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, Macon County Sheriff’s Office, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, Swain County Sheriff’s Office, Franklin Police Department, and Cherokee Indian Police Department.
The prosecution is being handled for the government by Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Kent of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Asheville.

Hospitals Limit Visitation

Due to the rising number of flu cases in our surrounding communities and facilities, Harris Regional Hospital and Swain Community Hospital have begun limiting visitors to the hospitals in order to reduce the risk of transmitting the flu to our patients, visitors, and staff. Restrictions will apply to visitors 12 years old and under and any visitor with symptoms of respiratory illness (fever, cough, sore throat, etc.).

According to the North Carolina Division of Public Health, the geographic spread of flu is now considered to be widespread, with four flu-related deaths having already occurred in North Carolina.

Exceptions to the restrictions, such as end-of-life circumstances, will be looked at on a case-by-case basis. Respiratory and hand hygiene stations are located at all entrances and on nursing units for visitors. Restrictions will continue from now until there is a significant decline in cases or flu season is considered over.

Visitors that are not feeling well and those under age 12 are encouraged to call patients rather than visit.

2014 State of the County Health Report

The Jackson County Department of Public Health recently completed the 2014 State of the County Health Report (SOTCH). The SOTCH report is an interim update to the Community Health Assessment (CHA) and is completed each year the CHA is not done. The last CHA was completed in 2011 and the next one will be done in 2015.

From the information presented in the 2011 Community Health Assessment, the assessment team and Healthy Carolinians of Jackson County selected the following health priorities: increase healthy eating (fruit and vegetable consumption), increase physical activity among adults (with a subcomponent of fall prevention with the senior population), and decrease substance abuse in adolescents (with a new focus on prescription drug abuse prevention). Action Teams of the Healthy Carolinians of Jackson County Partnership are currently working on each of these priority areas through their community action plans.

The SOTCH report compares the most recent health trends of Jackson County to Western North Carolina and North Carolina as a whole. Jackson County’s top three leading causes of death—cancer, diseases of the heart, and chronic lower respiratory diseases (CLRD)—are identical to the top three leading causes of death in North Carolina.

Interestingly, other recent trend data shows that the unintentional injury mortality rate (excluding motor vehicles) in Jackson County increased by 23.2% from the 2002-2006 to the 2008-2012 aggregate period. Further alcohol-related traffic accidents in Jackson County increased by 5.6% from 2011 to 2012. More crashes are alcohol-related in Jackson County than in Western North Carolina or North Carolina as a whole.

On a more positive note, Jackson County diabetes mortality rate is lower than both Western North Carolina’s and North Carolina’s as a whole. Jackson County saw an 8.2% decrease in diabetes mortality from the 2007-2011 aggregate period. Another health highlight is that Jackson County’s heart disease mortality rate decreased by 7.2% from the 2007-2011 to the 2008-2012 aggregate period. Males in Jackson County have had a higher heart disease mortality rate than females for the past decade.

Interviews with key leaders and health stakeholders indicated the following new or emerging issues affecting Jackson County’s health status: access to facilities and programs where youth can be physically active, lack of connection to locally grown foods, overweight children, cost of healthy food, violence, heroin use and the increased risk of Hepatitis and HIV from needle use, and alcohol-related traffic accidents. It is important to keep an eye on each of these issues as programs and projects are being planned in the community.

The full 2014 State of the County Health report can be viewed on the health department’s webpage http://health.jacksonnc.org, under the “Community Health Data” section. For any additional information please call Melissa McKnight at 587-8288. Hard copies are also available at the Health Department upon request.

Jackson County rockers Porch 40 to tour with Marshall Tucker Band in NC

t600-Porch 40Cullowhee-based “up and comers” Porch 40 announced that they will be taking part in The Marshall Tucker Band’s Winter Tour for three dates as they travel through North Carolina. Porch 40 will open for the renowned southern rockers at The Ritz (Raleigh Jan. 21), Cone Denim Entertainment Complex (Greensboro Jan. 23) and The Fillmore (Charlotte Jan. 24).

Touring with a group like The Marshall Tucker Band, who originated in Spartanburg, South Carolina with hits like “Can’t You See” and “Heard It in a Love Song,” is an experience that hits home to members of Porch 40.

“It’s a testament to how hard we’ve worked the past two years and very humbling at the same time,” said lead singer and rhythm guitarist Drew Duncan. “The guys have spent a lot of long nights writing original music, and we’ve practiced until our hands bled more times than I can count. I couldn’t ask for a better, more dedicated group of guys to chase my dreams with.”

While only playing together for a little over two years, Porch 40 has trail blazed their way into the area scene, growing into a regionally touring band. Formed while studying at Western Carolina University, the band has developed a bond and a sense of unity that comes once in a lifetime.

“Porch 40 is more like a family than a band,” said electric violinist Mitchell Metz. “Having our home base in a small town, we’ve established a sense of community and togetherness that has shaped the way we handle ourselves in every walk of life. Creating original music that makes people dance and feel good about themselves is what we’re all about.”

While having influences from genres across the board including funk, metal, jazz, folk, hip-hop and many more, southern rock holds a special place in the hearts of multiple members of the band.

While Duncan and drummer Spencer Bradley hail from Sylva and Cullowhee, bassist Carter McDevitt and saxophonist Scott Burr are originally from the Charlotte area.

“We couldn’t ask for a better band to rock with, and we appreciate The Marshall Tucker Band for having the faith in us to perform at a high level and make this the best experience for everyone involved,” Burr said. “Being away from home and going to school at Western Carolina University, I don’t get the chance to head back to Charlotte very often with our busy schedule. It seems like we’re always on the road, and that’s where I want to be.”

Porch 40’s debut album “Spread It Heavy” was released in September and is available on all major digital outlets, including but not limited to, iTunes, Amazon, Rhapsody, Spotify and more.

The members of Porch 40 are all between the young ages of 21-24 years old. Two of them are still attending Western Carolina University and will graduate this May. The band plans to hit the road for a full tour this summer/fall. In the meantime, they will continue to play area Western North Carolina venues on a regular basis while steadily branching out on a regional and national level this winter and spring.

“We’d like to thank all of the fans, venues, owners, booking agents, promoters, writers, DJ’s and everyone else who continues to support our movement. It’s because of their belief that we’re able keep this train rolling,” Duncan said.

For more information on the group’s album “Spread It Heavy,” visit

https://porch40.bandcamp.com/album/spread-it-heavy.

Meeting Upcoming for Cullowhee Community Planning Advisory Committee

As a result of comments received at the community meetings held in October and subsequent meetings and conversations with Cullowhee property owners, the Cullowhee Community Planning Advisory Committee has recommended changes to the proposed Cullowhee development standards and map.

The proposed designations of some properties have changed and the following properties have been removed from the proposed planning area:
• The NCCAT property and adjacent properties located on the west side of NC 107;
• The property occupied by the WCU staff apartments located behind Catamount Travel Center off Little Savannah Road;
• The Rogers family property and the adjacent WCU-owned property located on Monteith Gap Road.

Significant changes to the development standards include:
• A threshold has been established for requiring single family residential development to provide sidewalks. The threshold is 12 homes or lots; smaller developments will not have to provide sidewalks. In addition, trails may be provided in lieu of sidewalks with the approval of the Planning Council.
• Single wide manufactured homes are permitted on individual lots in the single family residential areas. Previously they were permitted only in manufactured home parks.

Cullowhee community will be Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 6:00 PM in the Hospitality Room at the Ramsey Center on the WCU campus.